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Full text of "Curryer"


AWHEEL WITHIN AWHEEL 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/curryer1977unse 




■071 "Biy® mi Amnm. 



THE CURRYER 




Volume 25 




Editor: Ruth -Ellen Burack 




ACTIVITIES 



Round likie a circle in a spiral, 
like a wheel witKiin a wheel. 
Never ending or beginning on an 
ever spinning reel. 
Like a snowball down a mountain, 
or a carnival ballon. 

Why did summer go so quickly? 
Was it something that you said? 
Lovers walk along a shore and 
leave their footprints in the sand. 

TTiat the autumn leaves were turning 

to the color of her hair! 

When you knew that it was over in 

the autumn of goodbyes. 

For a moment you could not recall 

the color of his eyes! 

Round like a circle within a circle, 
like a wheel within a wheel... 





This Book, a book 

Not dedicated to anyone, 

not written for anyone... 

but offered to those 

who know the beat of the, rain 

not the staccato of chalk 

to those who sense the bouquet 

of wine 

not the swilling of beer 

to those who value a slowly 

falling tear 

above a sharp peal of laughter. 





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% 
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•*4, 



Breaking records 



is 



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no 



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C 



Mass immunization favoadhedS«ineFlu 

Flu committee decides 
against stockpiling vaccine 




summsR 
(HVfflmcs 

1976 

us retracts threat 
of Olympic puUout 

Chandler wins 
3-meter dive 



NEWS 



Yankees sink Sox, 6-4, 
a pitcher ^s antics 

MARK FIDRYCH 

Was Orr the best? 
Statistics say Ves' 



Mars 

Tom Yawkey dies Viking lands, 











4*=^' 



<^ 



UJC 



lco«»^ 



,/or 



9^0r. 



// 



Let freedom ring 

Ford, Reagan, 
Carter each win 
three primaries 









^s 



f/ 



TALL SHIPS 



Bicentennial 
1976: . 




Happy 
Birthday 
Uncle Sam 




Boston 200 starts to pack 
after 4 Bicentennial years 




-V 




1 
7 
7 
6 



1 
9 
7 
6 



OFFENSE 

I N ST RU 

TENNI 




E F E NSE 
I O N A L 
CAMP 



SUMMER CONFERENCES 

AT 

CURRY COLLEGE 

1976 



Upward Bound 

Judo Camp 

Madison Scouts-Drum & Bugle Corps 




I, MASSACHUSETTS 




NEPHA 
Twelfth 
Annual 
Meeting 



v^eAL 






.^^" 



MAY 26, 27, 28, 1976 



DEMANDS. CONSTRAINTS, CREATIVITY 

INNOVATIVE STRATEGIES 

FOR ACHIEVING PUBLIC HEALTH GOALS 



The VOs obsession — 

me . . . my . . . myself 



Question 5 
would ban 
handguns 



EDWARD M. KENNEDY 

Democrat 
Incumbent 



ERA 



Ford and Carter 



NEWS 



Talk 



About Themselves 




Hearsts offer 
$500,000 bail 
for Patricia 

swine flu 

shots 



3 deaths 
probed 



Red, black dyes 
banned by FDA 



second debate 

3 US men 

CAMPAIGN '76 rr?*"** 

J>obels 



Mondale 



Gun control 



Carter Narrowly Beats Ford 



The 

leaves 

of 

autumn 



In search of foliage 



CB radio 



GET TO ^„.-*=: '""E 

BUBBLING ^^ ^%^ HELLUVA 

BROWN SUGAR" fliftjr SHOW! 

-Ki*ii Killy. ^BTiS* -''"' *•''■ 

Globi ^t%^ Hir. Ainirlcin 




Pocket Mime Theatre 




A Beatle is 
back strictly 
for the record 




FALL 



can»c 
be? 






Boston — 

a city where 
people like 

to dance 



PUT 

C L la A FITZGERALD, 

BUDDYrch 
COUNTras. 

V/ W W AR PETERSON 

AND DOZENS OF OTHER MUSIC 
GREATS TO WORK FOR YOUl 

With a booth at The Boston Globe Mu- 
sic Fair, you'll all be under the same 
roof! 



f&#- 




November 25-28, 1£i76 
Hynes Auditoriu ■; 
Prudential Cp. !: . rsoston 







Harvard athlete still critical 






SUNDAY GAME 


^ % 


^^L -3 


Patriots 

vs. Jets 

Patriots ground 


^^^\ 




sad Jets, 41-7 


^^v Evans ^^^^^ 

^V awarded ^^ 




lieds world 


^^ Golden Glove 




champs again 








I —they sweep 






Yankees, 7-2 








is 


nightmare 

at Schaefer Stadium 






Celtics 


Celtics win ^^ 




hoist flag, 


opener in OT, 129-122 

14 . : - ^ .: 


Sox Lose CI] 

. . . and 


lance At World Series 

Yaz is doing fine 



N.E, Conference football 

A different game 
in style^ tempo . . . 




COLONELS 

DEFEAT 

WESTERN 

CONN. 

AND 

BOSTON 

STATE 



SAY GOODBYE TO SUMMER VACATION 
AND SO IT ALL BEGINS . . . 

ANOTHER YEAR AT CURRY . . . 



The Last 




For Some 
A Beginning 





For Others . . 




FRESHMAN ORIENTATION 

This year's Freshman class was greeted by Curry with a busy 
and enjoyable weel< of orientation. They were regimented into 
alphabet troops and were given the opportunity to explore Boston 
for a scavenger hunt. Needless to say, they quickly became true 
Curryites and brought back the oddest of things. Aside from main- 
taining a very active social life, the class of 1980 also attended 
seminars Introducing them to "college life" and a few barbecues. 





Dr. Claudine Hogarth 

Honored 



Dr. Barbara Fournier 
Dr. Gertrude Webb 



Dr. Hiram Evans 



Honored 



When returning to Curry in Sept- 
ember, we found that we were given a 
new set of "guidelines" by the Dean 
of Student Life Office. Many of us 
were not content with this new situa- 
tion and meetings were held so we 
might see if there was a way to change 
the new "guidelines" and other polic- 
ies that we did not like or understand 
Thus came about the birth of the A ' 
College Conference, which was at- 
tended by Deans Kirschenmann and 
Calpalbo, the Curry Community, and 
Prof. Ned Hastings, who acted as 
moderator. Below are the results of 
the conference. 



ALL-COLLEGE CONFERENCE 



'' 


7?' 


n-'- 


1 


1 


L III 




A committee was established to 
study the Dean of Student Life's 
Office. 

Weekend Quiet Hours were aban- 
doned, but Quiet Hours during the 
week were maintained 




PARENT'S WEEKEND 

PARENT"S WEEKEND this year was a great 
success, thanks to Nancee Chalifour and Gary 
Leopold, Chairpersons of the event. But thanks 
also had to go to our parents and ourselves be- 
cause we made sure we all had a good time. 
Though we suffered through the loss of 21-20 
to Mass. Maritime, it was a good game. Another 
event was Las Vegas Night, where we watched 
parents and students alike turn into compulsive 
gamblers. 





LAS VEGAS NIGHT 




.".-JCJ>tOCJ''--5e--'^OC/«-^A'X»'fX'/»-'XA'3CA-X'AocAge. 



Come To The 



ANDNOWFORSOMETHING 
COMPLETELY DIFFERENT 



iisnon 




"A 

CAVALCADF 
OF 
INSANITY!" 



"A RIP-SNORTER. A TRIUMPH!" -J"d .h cr 
"•••.•BRILLIANTLY CONCEIVED, 
BRILLIANTLY DONE! DEVASTATINGLY FUNNY!" 








"A darkly chilling tale Sarah Miles is 
3 vibtant, but sexually repressed 
young widow. Breathtaking beauty 
and idyllic charm - lovingly 
photogranfied." 



b ^CV^V^V^V^ "/^^^/^V^-'"/ ^'*^-\^5C--/3CY^V^" 




TheTuielve Chairs 

'ONE OF THE FUNNIEST FILMS IN YEARS!" 





rTH 


^Wfcrii 


(Hi^^ 


^ w 




" MEL BROOKS 1 
The 2000 year old man | 

k ' "^ A 


u^ 


k^RANKUNGELU ' 1 
PThe lover boy from 1 


"^Diary of a Mad Housewife- 1 

1 J J 


u 


lifA 


IH^HPv"-'' ' W 


DOM DeLUISE 

Dean Martin's favof Jte 

TV dinner 


'm 


H 




Fh)in the Master of Shock I 

"Hitchcock is . _. • • »« _i •»•_ I 

,n F ,ne Form! A ShocKiHg Masterpwce i 



up 



Alfred Hitchcock has come 
th one of his best" 

William Wolf 
-CUE MAGAZINE 




Classic Hitchcock 




HOMECOMING WEEKEND 




This year, homecoming weekend 
started with a fifties dance. Real 
slick. 

The next day we saw our football 
team narrowly lose to Bridgewater 
State, by a score of 21-20. The 
Alumni Assoc, sponsored tailgate 
parties and a happy hour in honor of 
those who graduated already. 

Later that night, many of us went 
to the South Shore Country Club in 
Hingham. Nicely dressed and nicely 
feeling good, we saw Nancee Chalifour 
crowned HOMECOMING QUEEN. Her 
court consisted of Sheila Holt, Tish 
O'Connell, Maureen Durkin, Patty 
North, Helene Gelberg, and Jo-ann 
Roderiques. 








50'S DANCE 




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mi^ 





LECTURES AT CURRY 



^'THE 'ME' IN MEA>'IIVG' 



Connie Naitove Lecture 
At Curry College Nov. 5 

A lecture and demonstra'ionoi the technique of P0CU7 therapy wiU be pre<;enled b> Connie E. 
laitove an tjitcma nnally recognized aulhont> id the field on Fnday NovemberSat ) TOpm., 

:i the Lou's R I^\ in Memorial Lib ary at Curry Collpgc 




I of t^c College IT en- 
Tne Me Ir Veaning." 

;ri *" Ih" pilOlii. w lliout 



M A L S fequu 



sEduc, 



) from 






CONME NWTOV-E 



Dart"-oJth College i 
turer in arts Uier^py i 
Lollege the Unnersity of 
Vprn'ont Goddard College, and 
King way Fruicetoa College 

She has sho tiu^ht tnodeni 
d^nre under Martha Graham 
and drt uirder Florence CanP 
andW 11 imMcNdtv For three 
\ "M -s s*ie w a a member of the 
gu'st fscLliy 8l Dartmouth 
College teachinR child drama 
and ar' therapy 

She has had fiv one-uoman 
shows (if her hrl worlt and 
muscjm and gallery exhibits In 
five ••tales Canada England, 
Egypt, India, Japan, and 
Korea, as well as inclusion of 
her wr-k ia various American 
and French art publications. 

Id the field of therapy, she has 
ccnductad more than 30 
workshops for nattonal and 
Inlematjonal therapeutic and 
'educaticfial orginuat'ons and 
has had more than 20 
prafer^aional papers published 
in American, British, and in- 
trjrnati^nal journals She is 
pri?senUy writing two books on 
arts therapy - History of the 
Arts In Therapy and Art* 
Tl-erapj Technlqupfc. 

Dr. Frances Kohak, Chair- 
person of Curry's Division of 
Language and Literature, Is 8 
member of the PoelJ7 Therapy 
Association of America. She 
w-iil be leiiching a course in the 
tliprape\it:c uses of poetry, 
entitled Psycht-logicfll Per- 
spectivejt en Literature, during 
Curr..''s Spring Semester 
boginning in January. 





CURRY COLLEGE 

MILTON, MASS. 02186 

WHY DON'T WE USE WHAT WE KNOW WHEN 

WE KNOW SO MUCH? 

Mark your calendar for Wednesday, November 
lOth, 3:30-5:30 pm for the Little Theatre. 
Stephen E. Goldston, Ed.D. M.S.P.H., 
Cooordinator of Primary Prevention Programs 
for the National Institute of Mental Health will 
discuss the application, more honestly, THE 
LACK OF APPLICATION OF KNOWN MEN- 
TAL HEALTH CONCEPTS TO HUMAN SER- 
VICE PROGRAMS. 

Dr. Goldston is the author of seven books and 
monographs; his numerous articles have ap- 
peared in many journals and books. He brings 
with him the wisdom of 25 years of mental 
health-public health experience. The opportu- 
nity to meet and visit with Dr. Goldston is a 
rare privilege for the Curry Community. Remem- 
ber, Wednesday November lOth, 3:30-5:30 
pm in the Little Theatre. 

Sponsored jointly by the Division of Nursing 
Studies and the Social Committee of the Stu- 
dent Senate. 



CHRISTMAS 
AWARD'S NIGHT 

MASTER OF CEREMONIES . . . DEAN RICHARD 
MANTZ 

STUDENT ORGANIZATION AWARDS 
STUDENT SENATE . . . JEFFERY TARLETON 

yy.S.G.A PATRICIA NORTH 

M.G.B CLARK LINEHAN 

l-T.A.C NO AWARD GIVEN 

CHEERLEADERS KATHY SEXTON 

HILLEL MAXINE NAMEROW 

DROP-IN CENTER BARBARA LOVE 

i^.^rl-n^;';^ 'J^^^ LOEWand DOUG RICHARDS 

CURRIER -TIMES GRETCHEN BAKER 

SOCCER CLUB TREVOR MASSIAH 

ALUMNI AWARDS ROBERT J. BRAY 

DIANNA M. COCUZZA 

DIANE L. LARRIER 

DONNA M. CATALDO 

EVELYN TYNER 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AWARD LEON 

FACULTY AWARDS PROF^.^EDWARD 

HASTINGS 
PROF. DANTE GERMANOTTA 





Vacation. . "Q 



^ Santa Is Laid Low 
c^ By Holiday Crush 



SNOW 
By the Shovelful 

. AM)\\ii\Ts\iii\i) Ask the President 

P^ I I Art Buchwald STst state: Puerto Rico or Poland? 

^ irialiyUral Cymg Vance More payoffs by CIA reported 

^ O'lSeill becomes MtT^XTC ^^^® ^^^ Breakdown 

^^^ J^ ^r ^r ^^^ C huafio Mayor Richard Daley, who died Dec. 2U. 

Gilmore awaits 

Monday 

^ Tokyo ^^^^ ■ ^^ "^k execution 

w O ^^f ^^^^^ ^B ^^W ^^^ Safety guarantee 

^V ^^^^^ ^^^^^r ^A demand 

200-milelimit 



eft 



^ Speaker Tuesday 

^ pardon for 



Daoud 
is willing 
to testify 




Arnold Schwarzenegger in 



PumDing Iron 



Enter 1977;l Valentines 

KIRSCHENMANN RESIGNS 

Where will you spend the next two years? Curry Gets SRF Grant 
^->, -- Triffeletti Contracts 

Lurry Hoopsters rebound not renewed 

.p... ..M. ^muY snCKMEN 

MoU recent 35-28 triumph I wNITED 

Women HoopSters sport 3 t^^^^^^^^B^^^JHutchinson, Birchall light spark 



H 




Moran Wins 
Gold Helmet 
Award 

wo others nuke Honorable Mentioo, 

Two Colonels make 
All-Conference 

Raiders, 

penalties 

finish Patriots 

Pats' Haynes Top Defensive Rookie 

SEASON' Si WlNTER lGREETINGSl 

THE BOWL GAMES . . . Vikings or Raiders ^^,^^^3 ^,^ ^^^^ ^^^^ 

'"'''*' Gerald Stirs Up Ohio State 

Houston stuns ,„ 27.IO Orange Bowl Victory ^^^ "^'^ """"""^ '"' ^'' '" '"^^^ ''■' 

Maryland,30-2l C^j quarterback Joc Roth 

Pitt Finishes No. 1 after long cancer fight 

Curry'^s Fogel a zealot 
The wonderful world of coaching in Division Three. . . 33 




TO BE OR 

NOT TO BE 
THAT IS THE 

QUESTION 




???? ???? 



Abortion: pro - anti 
Seminar entitled: 

"To be or not to be . . . that is 
the question" 

Sponsored by the Drop - In - Center: 

Guest Speakers: 

Bill Baird 

Dr. Mildred Jefferson 

Monday. February 7, 1977 
^■"^ Room 119 



3b • • 



• • 



.50 with Curry I.D. 
S1.00 without Curry I.D. 



goo 




HAPpy 
syKJBuRtgf 
SEAsovJ To Come 
Ty?Ewe.iTEP- 

WALK. 

A&AlldSrTHE U\QMT 
GrRJNGrA 
WALK 0(;rs IDE 



1 



SOMG- OF 

WELCOME 

HOME 

RED WINDS 

X 

TAHlE 

HARP To SAY 

GERMAN TOWN 



WSICA®0[KI)l^ 



KiTTy 6(2AZ£UTbkl : voice, flufe re(UiTjl&f Kfiyboarji*. 

CAILLE GoLfiURHi ha.ps lGi'X«nis *«.. ' ' 

PAVIP CLARK.: tiectrxcl i'oi^^e b<iM« voice, v-k*. , manw 

au'hao^ pe>«uwiij«, voice. O 

TOIA STHPHEMSOJJ: dn- 



Vibw.manwba. 1 dtW pertwxio 



sound Hwtilti +0 Jam«y Reilly 



licJl,t.«j( by B*«c tWbsrT 




Carnations for sale! 

Delivered by 
The Sophomore class 



ilk 




Gong Show 



The MGB brought Curry its first 
Gong Show, followed by a dance 
with Music provided by Minus One. 
Everyone went so wild at the sight 
of Rob Lawrence's rendition of Mick 
Jagger that he won first place and a 
keg. Brian Cutler presided as em- 
cee, and Heather Ruhl was hostess 
of the show. The distinguished panel 
of judges consisted of Jim Young, 
Nancee Chalifour, and Gary Leopold, 
It can be pretty much agreed upon 
that the Gong Show was about the 
funniest activity on Campus this 
year. 




rower gf the Mind 
James J. cyMapes 

ESP 




HYPNOSIS 





Saccharin Banned 
Cancer Link Cited 






Larry 
Flynt 
hustled 
by the 
law? 

NEWS I 

Moslems Face Murder Charges 
How Clinton 
Won Jimmy Cartel 

AC ADEMY AWARDS 

Top Oscars go to 'Rocky,'' 
Finch and Dunaivay 



Ei^^n 




Hughes Fortune 
Put at $168 MilUon 




^ 



03 



GIRLS BASKETBALL 
TEAM COMPLETES 
WINNING SEASON 



ALEX 
HALEY 

TELLS THE STORY OF 
HIS SEARCH FOR 

« ROOTS 

o 

SPRING 

Are You Body Beautiful? 

Marquette, NC 
slip into final 
Michigan Favored 

To Top Crusaders 

w^m IndySOO ^^m 

Sox erupt, 17-12 
NHL, NBA playoffs 

Stanley Cup 

Winners: 

MONTREAL CANADIANS 




Perry Named National 
Freshman of Year 

Celtics lose in the 7th game 



76ers trounce Celtics, 110-91; lead series 3 games to 2 




W^v^ V 



Black Cultural Weekend coincided with this 
year's visit from possible Curry freshmen. From 
Curryites and "high school kids" alike came a 
distinct feeling of excitement and visions of 
hangovers. We also looked forward to the cele- 
bration of black culture, a subject of which some 
of us knew little or nothing about. 

Friday afternoon brought an exhibition of 
Marlene Lundvall's African Masks in the Drap- 
kin Center. Also in the afternoon was a Happy 
Hour. Those of us who survived that event went 
to a Disco Dance later that evening. 

On Saturday afternoon we said good-bye to 
our guests and were entertained by performances 
of students from the Elma Lewis School of Fine 
Arts that night. 



BLACK CULTURAL 
WEEKEND 





THE ELMA LEWIS SCHOOL OF FINE ARTS 





The 3rd meeting of the Lombard Zoo-State House Com- 
mittee will now come to order. 




With nurses like this around you can see the reason why I'm 
sick and injured all the time. 



Which way to Muscle Beach? 





INTERNATIONAL NIGHT PROGRAM 

Presented by 

The International Students Club 

of 

Curry College 

Milton, Massachusetts 

Friday, April 15, 1977 

DINNER Featuring International Foods 

ENTERTAINMENT 

Nigerian Dance Tunde and Milce 

IsraeU Dance Irish Hardoon, Margie McMuUen 

Sandra Anderson, Pat Schmiegelow, Ann Bowie 

Greek Dance Nick Chigos 

Indian Folk Song Dr Sherring 

Afro-Caribbean Dance Gregory Little 

Belly Dance Laura Markowitz 

Shekiri Dance Tunde Adheyinka 

Sirtaki Dance Chan Donavanik, Trevor, Tom, John Gede 

Richard Clifford, Bachman, Armand 

DISCO DANCE Music from the 50's through the 70's 

Dancing until 1:00 A.M. 




^ 






x^ 





h 



1 



ff 



CURRY COLLEGE SPRING AWARDS BANQUET 



This banquet recognizes and honors individuals whose achievements durinc 
their association with the college are particularly distinguished. Members of 
the Alexander Graham Bell Honor Society were inducted also. 



Seniors 
Maria Bacigalupo 
Ruth Burack 
Susan Damberg 
Jeffery Lowe 
Richard Naran 



Alexander Graham Bell Honor Society 



Juniors 
Richard Bengston 
Mary DiNallo 
JoAnne Roderiques 
Jeanne Turner 



Academic Awards 

Psychology Award Maria Bacigalupo 

English Award Penny Powell 

Political & Historical Studies Kevin Janet 

Elementary Education Award , Andrea Quinn 

Secondary Education Award ■ Richard Naran 

Early Childhood Award Midge Finch 

Moderate Special Needs Award Maria Bacigalupo 

Science Division Award Rick Lawson 

C.A.S. Award Jim Brown 

Management Award Janet Feeney, Jeff Tarleton 

Broadcasting Award Jeff Lowe 

Special Awards 

Yearbook Award Chris Andrade 

Outstanding Woman Athlete Terry Sambucci 

Special Award Prof. McCann 

Dean of Student Life Award Staff 

Barbara F. Pettingill Award Staff 

Alumni Achievement Awards , Carol MacDonatd, Mark Warter 

Outstanding Male Commuter , Mike O'Sullivan 

Outstanding Female Commuter Gretchen Baker 

Special Commuter Award Jeff Lowe 

Administrative Achievement Award Warren Bazirgan 

Outstanding Female Resident , Ruth Burack 

Outstanding Male Resident Carl Scheig 

Special Award Gary Leopold 

Faculty Achievement Awards Frances Kohak, Gertrude Webb 

M.G.B.-W.S.G.A. Person of the Year Fred Kirschenmann 




ALL-COLLEGE 
CELEBRATION 



This year a celebration which 
included the whole Curry Community 
was initiated. It started with a hap- 
py hour featuring a $50 door prize 
and the announcements of President 
Hafer's retirement and his accep- 
tance of the role of Chancellor of 
the College. Afterwards, we were 
treated to a Garden Party dinner at a 
very nicely decorated Drapkin Cen- 
ter. Since it was a Thursday Night, 
further celebrating was done at the 




Loose Caboose. We have Taryn 
McCarthy and Ellie Carabello to 
thank for preparing the Celebration. 
Congratulations to Gary Leopold who 
won the door prize! 





;i 




■S'Si 




^ifim$ 



Spring Weekend 1977 was 
held at the Shaefer Stadium Club 
in Foxboro. The dinner was fabu- 
lous and those who wanted to 
dance did so to the sound of the 
band Ocean. Everyone went wild, 
and the event was well worth it. 




If you sit down and think about it, you spend about 90% of your time in college shooting 
the bi-eeze with your friends. From these intercourses develop sayings and phrases that a certain 
group of people will use throughout the year. Often you' I! think of a certain word or phrase 
and you'll automatically remember someone who made use of those certain groups of words. 
A bunch of people remembered the following words and sayings that we used this year. Keep in 
in mind that not everything we said was printable, so they're not all here. 

Don't Leave me this way . , . Fizz . . . Are you baked? ... I can't function . . . Dee- 
bor-ah, where are you?. . . Madame Marge and her Penthouse Sweets . . . R-0-W-D-I-E, 
that's the way we spell rowdy . . . what is it? , , . bing, bang, bong . . . Wham, bam, outa 
here. . . twist my arm . . . gimme a shake. . . you dilly . . . what Is hip? . . , bimbo . . . 
Perversion Excursion , . . feather, won't you make me high ... be bop bo . . , fig . . . humble 
, . . the bird . . . simply elegant ... go wild, Everett ... go mental . . . later, as in much . , , 
lose it . . . hoot . . . don't make me wretch . . . very nice . . . history . . . All talk, no action 
. . .let's blow this hot dog stand . . , chump . . . zero sputnik . . . yuk, yuk . . . nerd . , . nim- 
rod . . . give him the gate . . . it's bad . . . no, sir . . . listen to this . . . heaven must be miss- 
ing Arena . . . gar . . . roots . . . dome damage . . . life is a bowl of cherries and this is the pits 
. life is a cesspool, so let's flush it . . . swell . . . humungous . . . yeah, right here, buddy 
. my stars ... do you have a liscense to carry those things? . , , ho . , , looped . . , gonzo 
. purrrrrrr . . . pft, pft . . . B.F.D. . . . S.M.C. . , , the zoo . . . it's beat . . . lost my cookies 
. excellent . . . alright . . . yes, love . . , later, chickie , . . walk much?. . , talk much? 
. it's the best . . . decent . , . it's a pissa . . . wicked good , , . it's a boy . . . the bush . . . 
hot damn . . , hells bells . . . lola . . . foolish . . . panic . . . botard . . . fairy nice , . . fem- 
tastic . . . disco lives . . . such is life . . . file it under "F" . . . Rocky Windows . . . out to 
lunch bunch . . . throw out your burnt , . . basic dub . . . wrong! . . . gross me out . . . you 
suck . . . life's a bitch . . . you make me feel like transom . . . Farrah fantasies . . . slow jo's 
. . . Milton Hilton . . . whippo . . . turd ... sit on it .. . rotate . . . howdy wow, friends and 
neighbors . . . reem . . . buns , . . crass . . . huge . . . M&M's, plain and peanut . . . 




1977 

That was the year that brought us 
many things. It gave us "Rocky", 
cowl necks, THE HUE REPORT, 
Beatlemania, double-grilled burger 
makers, and two assistant deans. We 
had our laughs, tears, ups, downs, 
A's and N.R.'s. If anything can be 
said about Curry in 1977, it is that it 
was a place where one could live and 
learn day by day, even if some of 
those days seemed a bit more tedious 
than others. 
1977 

That was the year that in its exit 
took with it two deans, one president, 
a few professors, and a burnt Howard 
Johnson's. Well, next year, 1978, 
will bring us our deans, president, 
professors, and a renovated Howard 
Johnson's with an addition of a cock- 
tail lounge. Things get better all the 
time. 

1978 

The year that will bring changes, 
up, downs, laughter, tears, A's and 
N.R.'s. It will be another year to 
learn; another circle, but a bigger cir- 
cle, fuller and more exciting. 





N 



SPORTS 




NO MATTER WHAT THE LOSS 





A WINNING SEASON!! 




First Row: Coach Connelly, J. Shadduck, F. Mills, P. Levesque, C. Finn, Co-capt. R. Moran and Co-capt. J. Calirs, M. Mor- 
ris, T. Fair, M. Coppola, D. Grosvenor, J. Henningson, Coach Stephens Second Row: Coach White, E. Charamut, S. Matthews, 
J. Scollins, P. Race, J. Noonan, B. Forbes, M. Maroney, S. Faulkner, D. Monteiro, P. Pietrantonio, D. Myers, Coach Browne 
Third Row: Trainer Ruth Burack, R. Padula, D. Hurley, B. Clarke, W. Hatch, J. Santuccio, J. Ricciardelli, J. Spano, J. Pan- 
aro, B. Kitterman, P. Ellis, B. Roast, Coach Beatrice Fourth Row: B. Levesque, S. Medwid, E. Pond, D. Berthiaume, M. 
Quinn, J. Kennedy, D. Christopher, J. LoConte Missing: R. Rose, B. Elwell, J. Tarleton, E. Arena, S. McGinnity, T. Alcott, 
B. Smith, G. Gerade, M. Verraso 




mr 



All during the season the training room in the gym was 
a center of activity. Coach Stephens wondered why there 
was always something going on in there. Well, this year the 
Colonels had Ruth Burack as their Manager and Trainer, 
and the team had to adjust to wearing shorts when they 
came out of the locker room (some weren't able to adjust!). 
It was something different for Curry and the beginning of a 
trend involving women as athletic trainers. 

The men's football team had a fairly successful season 
this year. Co-captains Jan Callis and Rich Moran sparked 
the team to break a twelve game losing streak. 

The competition was stiff but not too stiff for Curry. 
The team won all away games and lost all home games. 
Two of the games were lost by only one point. Their over- 
all record in the IM.E. Football Conference was 4-4. 

Quarterback Tom Fair threw for H40 yards and more 
touchdown passes than any other Curry passer. Tom and 
Rich Moran were both elected to the All-Conference team. 
Rich is the first player to make it both ways. Mitch Morris 
and Joe Noonan received honorable mention. 





Nichols 


27 


Western Conn, 


6 


Boston State 


12 


Mass. Maritime 


24 


Framingham 


10 


Maine Maritime 


21 


Univ. of New Haven 


15 


Bridgewater 


21 


Plymouth State 


14 







rU 



■J 






FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOO 




BALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FOOTBALL FO^ 



en 

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SOCCER LIVES . . . 



The soccer team struggled its way through 
the season. Due to lack of support, the team 
had to provide its own uniforms, equipment 
and transportation. All of the games were ten- 
tatively scheduled. 

Through all of it the team showed spirit 
and fought the whole season, but it was not 
enough. The Soccer team had to fold and 
will not be seen next year. 




C. McGuire, Coach, S. Wilson, Asst. Coach and Manager, A. Hollingsworth, Asst. Coach, T. Messiah, Captain, P. Paulli, 
Captain S. Fearing, M. Tally, A. Arief, C. Donovanic, K, Janet, J. Scheuer, R. Kuniholm, T. Greene, B. Cutler, D. Ranoff, 
J. Schafer, A. Amirsalah, B. Sturgess, G. Sprachio, E. Brick, R. Kunz, J. Kenyon 
"To those who I've forgotten, I apologise. The most sincerest thanks to you for we all know inside that we tried." Peter Paulli 








S. Am. Amateur League 
M.I.T. 

Mass. Maritime 
U. Mass. -Greek Club 
U. Mass.-W. Indies Club 
Framingham State 
Hampshire College 
U. Mass. -Greek Club 
orhteastern Univ. -Irian Clut 



17 
9 
3 
6 
5 
6 
3 
4 
5 



AND DIES 



A SHORT SEASON 



W-'^x IW'^ 




First Row: I Schemer, I\l. Smith, Co-capt S. IVleagher, Co-capt. S. Holt, J. Torres, P. McLean Second Row: R. Tralnor, M. 
Coleman, L. Daly, P. Cleary, M. Durkin, C. Luca, L. Pompliano, Third Row: Coach lorio, L. Brain, Coach Carroll, P. Gush, 
S. Tucker, M. Silsby, J. Stevens, S. Mott, K. Farren, Coach Rendon 




LAG FOOTBALL FLAG FOOTBALL FLAG FOOTBALL FLAG FOOTBALL F 




The Curry College Women's Football team 
had its share of bad breaks this year. There 
was a scheduling problem and the girls played 
only two games. Both games were against 
Boston State and both times Curry was defeat- 
ed. However, the girls never gave up and they 
enjoyed themselves. There was alot of talent 
on the team and the girls are hoping to develop 
it to its fullest potential for next season. 



Boston State 
Boston State 



12 

14 




\G FOOTBALL FLAG FOOTBALL FLAG FOOTBALL FLAG FOOTBALL FLA( 



THE SHOOTING GALLERY 




...Back Row - Ass't Coach, Don Doucette. M. Morris, J. Kelly, F. Stubbs, P. Hughes, R. Whitaker, Head Coach, Karl 
Fogel... Front Row - S. Connolly, C. Dane, I. Rutledge (captain), J. Keaney (captain), J. Ventura, J. Murray 




This year the Curry College Basketball 
team was featured on the front page of the 
Sports Section of the BOSTON GLOBE. 
Coach Fogel had many thoughts on his job 
as Head Coach, and expressed his attitudes 
about the team . 

"When you're playing a team you figure is a lot 
better than you," he said, "you're not nervous. Before 
some of our games this year, I mould have been happy 
just to make a good showing. But this time I'm really 
nervous. If we're going to be a .500 team this year, 
we've got to beat teams like this. We ought to be able 
to win this game. It's not the 3-18 Coaches who get 
the ulcers; it's the 18-3 coaches." 

He was talking about Mass Maritime. 

"IVlass Maritime had run Curry off the floor, nobody 
had taken a single charge and Coach Fogel himself had 
been banished after receiving three technical fouls for 
protesting a non-call a bit too strenuously." 

Mass Maritime had beat Curry 97-65. 
And so the season went. Curry had some 
fine shooters in Joe Keaney and Charlie 
Dane. "Butch" Whitaker and Frank Stubbs 
were our high jumpers. The team was sup- 
ported by players like Jim Murray and Pat 
Hughes . Together they played a tough sea- 
son and finished with a record of 9-15. 





74 


Barrington 


84 


92 


Nichols 


79 


85 


SMU 


80 


74 


Barrington 


86 


82 


Roger Williams 


77 


69 


U Mass (Boston) 


79 


83 


Western N. E. 


98 


83 


Roger Williams 


106 


53 


Coast Guard 


51 


82 


Eastern Nazarene 


97 


84 


U Mass (Boston) 


94 


65 


Mass Maritime 


97 


84 


Salem State 


103 


92 


Nichols 


89 


85 


Gordon 


65 


82 


Eastern Nazarene 


99 


90 


Thomas 


69 


74 


Framingham State 


89 


67 


SMU 


69 


98 


New England 


82 


87 


Gordon 


76 


69 


Suffolk 


82 


71 


Bridgewater 


84 


74 


Mass Maritime 


75 




ONE WINNING WINTER SPORT! 




Back Row - L. Kingsbury, J. Stevens, J. Connolly. Middle Row - N, Smith, L, Brain, M. Silsby, J, Fee- 
ney, K. Richards. Front Row - Assistant Coach J. Shanahan, P. Cleary, J. Torres, Head Coach IVl. Brown 





23 


Endicott Jr. College 


36 


21 


Mt. Ida 


64 


35 


Northeast Tradewlnds 


28 


69 


La Salle 


39 


48 


Suffolk 


24 


60 


Stonehill 


40 


45 


La Salle 


31 


42 


Endicott Jr. College 


57 



This year's girls basketball team marked a tremendous 
improvement over last year's winless squad as they compiled 
an 8-7 record with first year coach Mike Brown and his as- 
sistant Jim Shanahan. Despite a few setbacks to bigger and 
more experienced teams, the girls were able to hold their 
own against most of their opponents. Freshman Janet Torres 
led the girls offensively all year long, averaging over 16 
points a game. Defensively, Patty Cleary filled in the big 
spot and Jane Connolly provided the needed board strength 
as well as some offensive punch. Nora Smith, Janet Feeney, 
and Linda Brain rounded out the first six players, but the re- 
maining six contributed in their own way, and every girl got 
in the scoring column this year. After a shakey start, the 
girls got their first win of the season over Bunker Hill and 
the season was up and down from then on. Their biggest win 
of the year came over La Salle as they rolled up a 66-39 
romp. With a 7-7 record and their winning season on the 
line, the girls beat La Salle 45-31 as Janet Torres and Kitty 
Richards led the way and the girls had completed the only 
winning season of the winter sports program at Curry this 
year. 

Stephen Medwid 




H BASKETBALL BAS^ 



THE ICEMEN COMETH! 



NO SMOKING 
10 ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 




First Row: B. Ferrari, N. Ricciardeiti,- B. Balletto, Co-capt., B. Raeburn, D. Centauro, Co-capt., P. O'Rourke, J. Meade, 
IVI. IVIcDonnell, J. Kelley. Back Row: CoacPi Brown, T. Campo, W. Keates, IVI. Birchall, B. Dooley, B. Hutchinson, V. 
Pacello, i\^. Keates, Manager-D, Lancaster, not pictured: S. McClean. 







f 



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Bob Balletto, #12, and Nick Ricciardelli, #19, facing off. 



^»mm 



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^li 



This year's hockey season had its ups and downs and the 
team finished with an 8-12-1 record. Offensively, the Colo- 
nels were in good shape as they were led by Mark Birchall 
, (13 goals, 16 assists). Bob Ferrari (18 goals, 10 assists), 
^ However, defensive lapses plagued the Colonels and cost 
i them a winning season. After a disastrous 2-4 beginning, the 
Colonels offense got in gear and they rolled up a four home 
game winning streak which included a hat trick by Hutchin- 
son in their 5-4 win over Nichols. The offense then tapered 
] off until they crushed N.H. 10-3 as eight Colonels got in 

the scoring column. This was followed by big wins over 
'^ SMU which saw Hutchinson get his second hat trick of the 
year, and a victory over Hawthorne in which Birchall got 

I-!- C- i I 1. I...- -I. _r ii. 1 f r ■ • I _ I r I 



1113 iiioL iiai ulV/^ ui uiic scaouii. jeii iviedut: oriu irc:>ni[i< 

' Nick Ricciardelli also provided some scoring punch for 
Curry, and Co-capt. Paul O'Rourke and Bob Balletto 
/ W P'^y^^ ^^" ^^^^ offensively and defensively for the 
™*^ Colonels. Despite their losing record, the Colonels 
are still young and will only lose the services of 
\ O'Rourke and Raeburn, so next year's season 
<K looks very bright. 

^ ^^^ Stephen Medwid 



4 


St. Francis 


6 


7 


Mass. Maritime 


5 


3 


SMU 


7 


4 


Worcester Polytech 


3 


4 


Bentley 


6 


1 


Assumption 


5 


5 


Nichols 


4 


5 


NHC 


2 


3 


Assumption 


4 


1 


Mass. Maritime 


8 


1 


MIT 


2 


1 


Stonehill 


4 


10 


NHC 


3 


8 


SMU 


5 


5 


StoneHill 


8 


6 


Hawthorne 


4 


5 


Worcester Polytech 


3 


7 


Hawthorne 


5 


6 


St. Francis 


8 


5 


NHC 


5 


3 


St. Francis 


13 




■Melvin" on the slide! 



Y HOCKEY HC 



YOU CAN'T WIN 'EM ALL 



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WGKEY HOMiiiOGKEY HOCKEY HOCKEY HOitEYiOCKEY H' 



THEY COULDN'T BUY A BASE 



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Back Row: P, Levesque, J. Indiviri, G. Leopold, C. Finn, T. Fair, D. Lancaster, J. Kelly, R. IVIoran, S. 
Connolly, G. Pappas, D. Burke, T. Campo. Front Row: B. Smith, B, Vallely, T. Massiah, L. Rosoff, D. 
Meyer, P. Harrington, N. Hopping, V. Puttaro, B. Rose, l\l. Ricciardelli, T. Lewis 




'fSEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BA! 




This year's baseball team suffered their second losing sea- 
son in 29 years as the Colonels compiled a 9-11 record. 
The defending NEIBA champs just fell short of repeating 
that championship as they lost to Franklin Pierce. Weak 
pitching plagued the Colonels all season, but the team did 
bat an impressive .291, and fell short of last year's nation 
leading .351 team batting average. Seniors Gary Leopold, 
Rich Moran, and Paul "Stumpy" Levesque were named to the 
NEIBA All Conference Team. Seniors Charlie Finn and Tom- 
my Fair came through with clutch hits and Norman Hopping 
was the lone standout pitcher. A bright spot for the Colonels 
was freshman Bob Rose who carried a hot bat toward the 
end of the season and filled in as catcher. Faced with 
elimination from the NEIBA tournament, the Colonels 
swept a doubleheader from Hawthorne to qualify for the 
tournament. The Colonels beat New Hampshire in the 
opening game of the tournament to reach the finals where 
they lost to Franklin Pierce by a score of 1-6 to end 
their season. 

Stephen Medwid 



4 


Suffolk 


13 


2 


Nichols 


16 


13 


New England 


6 


9 


New England 


1 


1 


New Hampshire 


6 





Franklin Pierce 


7 


2 


Franklin Pierce 


4 


2 


Assumption 


9 


6 


Barrington 


15 





Mass Maritime 


15 





Mass Maritime 


11 


7 


Hawthorne 


4 


5 


Hawthorne 

NEIBA TOURNAMENT 


6 


10 


New Hampshire 


5 


1 


Franklin Pierce 


6 



BALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL 




ASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEB 




LL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBALL BASEBft^ 



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THE CONEHEADS! 




Back Row: Coach J. Kelly, J. Connolly, P, Calarese, S, Holt, R. Trainor, T, McMeill, S. Meagher, D. 
French, K. O'Sullivan, J. Harrison, Coach B. Connolly. Middle Row: D. Bostwick, E. King, J. Connelly, 
L. Kingsbury, E. Mittleman, T. Sambuchi, M. Stiglitz. Front Row: L. McAuliffe, L, Brain, C. Andrade 



9 


Mt. Ida 


16 


8 


Bentley 


11 


16 


Mass Bay 


10 


15 


Endicott 


16 


14 


Endicott 


10 


17 


Mass Bay 


22 






Ump, you are blind. That wasn't a strike! 



RL'S SOFTBALL GIRL'S SOFTBALL GIRL'S SOFTBALL GIRL'S SOFTBALL 



"2,^>V^W '■'»■"" 



/H V >-, . ^^'^V '. tV ' V ■ • -V. A\\\\^."3 




OFTBALL GIRL'S SOFTBALL GIRL'S SOFTBALL GIRL'S SOFTBALL GIRL 



TENNIS IS FOR LOVERS! 




ENNIS TENNIS TENNIS TENNIS TENNIS TENNIS TENNIS TENNIS TENNIS 




The Colonels had loyal fans who came to 
every game, and there were many who weren't as 
loyal. Everyone has a special way to occupy 
sparetime and following Curry sports was one 
way for a loyal few. 



IPECTATORS PLAYERS SPECTATORS PLAYERS SPECTATORS PLAYERS 



Despite many obstacles, many 
students come out to participate in 
sports. The Women's Athletic pro- 
gram is the weakest, but because of 
the great perseverance of many female 
students the program is getting better. 
The women are getting better coaches, 
but still need better equipment and 
better scheduling. This year they were 
playing State Schools which were out 
of their league. They won some games 
and lost some, but kept their spirit 
throughout. 




1EN & WOMEN 



WOMEN MEN & WOMEN MEN & WOMEN MEN ( 




The Soccer team saw its first 
and last season because the Ad- 
ministration would not support it. 
The Athletic budget is constantly 
being cut, but the athletes still 
are willing to put their all into 
their sport in order to represent 
Curry. They might not win every 
game or come up with a champion- 
ship, but they try and this is what 
really counts in the world of Curry 
Sports, 




WOMEN MEN & WOMEN MEN & WOMEN MEN & WOMEN MEN & WO 






CO 



FLAG FOOTBALL 






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THE 
MISFITS 



Back Row: T. Greene, C. Seymour, K. Keating, G. Leopold, N. Lettire, Front Row: 
C. LeBlanc, N, Hopping, B. Tagrin, G. Muzio 




As always, Intramural Flag 
Football was very competitive. The 
intramural teams were composed of 
athletes who participate in other var- 
sity sports as well as athletes in 
general who could not play varsity 
sports. 

The Finals came down to the 
Misfits, led by Norman Hopping, 
Kevin Keating, and Gary Leopold, 
and Main House, led by Jack 
Pierce, Tim Lewis, Mike Gard- 
ner and Ron Leftwich. It was a 
bitterly fought playoff week, and 
the playmaking ability of the Mis- 
fits was found to be the deciding 
factor over the much bigger Main 
House team. Robert Connolly 




BASKETBALL 



THE 
ROOKIES 




Back Row: M. Cember, G. Leopold, T. Gahr, N, Hopping. Front Row: S, 
Medwid, l\l, Lettire, T. Alcott, B. Smith 





This year's Basketball 
league was most successful and 
highly competitive, and saw 8 
teams participating. The 4 
teams that made the playoffs 
were all evenly matched. Those 
teams were the Rookies, Fast 
Breakers, ABMW, and the 
Sandbaggers. It boiled down to 
the Rookies and the Fast 
Breakers in the Finals. 

The Rookies were the 
eventual winners and were led 
by Gary Leopold, Bob Smith, 
and Tom Gahr. The Fast 
Breakers were led by Cliff 
Cioffi, Rick Lawson, and Dave 
Berthiaume. Both teams com- 
bined their efforts and sent 
their best players to an invi- 
tational All-Star Game. 



SOFTBALL 




THE 
DISCO INFERNO 



Back Row: C, Cioffi, S. Medwid, D. Berthiaume, K. Keating, R. Leftwich, 
R. Lawson . Front Row: J. Keany (behind the glove), J. Murray, E. Charamut, 
B. Kitterman, T. Woodward 

} ■% 



Intramural Softball got off to a late start 
because of the prolonged winter conditions . 
Once the season got under way, it was a fast 
and furious chase to the playoffs. 

A doubleheader between the Disco Inferno 
and B.J, 's Army was split between the two 
teams. The final playoff game left the Disco 
Inferno as the champions. They were led by 
Joe Keany, Cliff Cioffi, Dave Berthiaume, 
Jim Murray, and Steve Medwid who were 
valuable in all areas of the field. 



9{ 



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THE JOCKS 



'— ^4=, 






.** 



HERE'S TO THE WINNERS 



FOOTBALL 
BANQUET 

Held at Lombardo's 





Men's Varsity Football 


Offensive 




Lineman 


Mitchell Morris 


Defensive 




Lineman 


Dave Berthiaume 


Most Valuable 




Player 


. Richard Moran 


Flag Football 




Offensive Player 


. . Janet Torres 


Defensive Player 


... Sheila Holt 




f^'^ ' T!;! '* ^-; !' , i 



Pete Vallic 

Main Speaker 
Manager, New England Patriots 




Bob Rose 

Defensive Back of 1976 



Tommy Fair 



Offensive Back of 1976 



Trevor Massiah 

Most Valuable Player of 1976 

AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWA 



SOCCER AWARD 




Bob Ferrari 

Most Valuable Player 




Most Valuable Player Joe Keany 

Defensive Player Charlie Dane 

Best Team Player Jim Murray 



Defensive Player Jane Connolly 

Leading Rebounder Patti Cleary 

Unsung Hero Janet Feeney 

Most Improved Kitty Richards 

Outstanding Freshman Linda Brain 

Nora Smith 



Janet Torres 

Most Valuable Player 




.^.■ 




Jean Harrison 

Most Valuable Player 



BASEBALL 

Richard Moran 
Paul Levesque 

Most Valuable Players 



RDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS 



THE LAST ROUND FOR SENIORS 




Back Row: M. Coppola, M. Morris, P. Levesque, T. 
Fair, C. Finn Front Row: J. Callis, R. Moran 



G. Leopold, T. Fair, C. Finn, R. Moran, P. Levesque 




R. Raeburn 



SOCCER 

Marshall Tally 
Kevin Janet 
Brian Cutler 



P. O'Rourke 



TENNIS 
Clark Linehan 
Grayson Holly 



GIRL'S SOFTBALL 
Chris Andrade 
Jean Harrison 
Rosemary Trainor 
Debbie Bostwick 
Kathy O'Sullivan 




BASKETBALL 
Issac Rutledge 
Kitty Richards 



JPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SP 




I never liked Hockey 
anyway! 



Mighty Mouse is on his way 






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ORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPORTS SPO 




Yesterday a child came out to wonder 
Caught a dragonfly inside a jar 
Fearful when the sky was full of thunder 
And tearful at the falling of a star. 




Then the child moved ten times round the seasons 
Skated over ten clear frozen streams 
Words like, when you're older, must appease him 
And promises of someday make his dreams 




JUNIORS 




So the years spin by and now the boy is 20 

Though his dreams have lost some grandeur coming true 




There'll be new dreams, maybe better dreams 
Before the last revolving year is through. 



SOPHOMORES 



F 
R 
E 
S 
H 
M 
E 
N 




Rick Padula, President, Janet Torres, Vice-President, Joan Denihan, Secretary, William 
Schultz, Treasurer 

After having the Fall semester to get 
accustomed to a new life at college, the 
Freshman Class sponsored a dance on Janu- 
ary 21 and raised the $422.00. We con- 
tributed $25.00 to the All College Celebra- 
tion which was sponsored by the Student 
Senate. 

The Freshman class is the "Centennial 
Class" and will see many changes throughout 
our remaining four years. 



^ ^fj. 



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Yesterday a child came out.to wonder 
Caught a dragonfly inside a jar 
Fearful when the sky was full of thunder 
And tearful at the falling of a star 



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'^^'■jiiin iH 


■193 




During the Fall of '76 the Sophomore Class 
sponsored a series of Movie Nights. The high- 
light of the Fall semester was an Election Night 
Celebration where we watched the outcome of the 
presidential elections - peanuts and all! 

This past Spring, we held a very successful 
Carnation Sale on Valentine's Day and also spon- 
sored a Sadie Hawkins Dance. 




Cindy Smith, President, Sue Bernard, Vice-President, Judy Pachelto, Secretary, Carol 
Crowley, Treasurer 




standing: Ruth Lucas, Secretary Sitting: Sheila Holt, Vice-President, JoAnne Ro- 
deriques. President, Jeanne Turner, Treasurer 




The Junior Class sponsored many fundi 
raising events to increase our account to-l 
wards Senior Week '78. We ran a Tournaf 
ment Night, a Raffle on Parent's Weekend!! 
and Horseracing Night. The grand finale 
was the Spring Flea Market and Arts Fairf 
which was a terrific financial and social . 
success. 

As a class we are proud of what we 
have accomplished. We look forward to a 
busy year of events that will lead to a new 
and different kind of Senior Week which 
will celebrate the end of our four years at 
Curry. 





So the years spin by and now the boy is" 

twenty 
Though his dreams have lost some grandeur 

coming true 
There'll be new dreams, maybe better 

dreams and plenty 
Before the last revolving year is through 




And the seasons 
nunc/ . 



and the painted ponies 

up 
go and 



we're captive on a 
carousel of time 
we can't return we 
can only look behind 
from where we came 



In the circle game 





Kimberly M. Bolden 
Biology 




3^j>0tK lb device l)e«oyv\cL. . . 
)aJovl3T^e\f <*uest fo se1fKoo<i. 

Mack irtgKt f ii.nc)uiQ 
€sr fe stoKt unseen. 





BIOLOGY 



Clifford Cioffi 
Biology 




Transplantation . . . Choff . . . Tony. B. . . 
J.D.PV. . . Law . . . Scholars 24,37 . . . Main 
House . . . 17,63 . . . H. Hayes. Mt. . . Kisco 
Boys . . . Bury Boys . . . Maiden Boys & Girls . . . 
Big 'D' . . . Science Division People . . . Hoop 2 
yrs. . . Tennis . . . 12-9, 9-12, 4-4 .. . all 
night parties, the Golden Tornadoes are coming . . . 
parties anytime . . . back porch parties . . . politely 
asked not to have gatherings by student life's office . 
. . Security, Conference Center, Gym, Maintenance . 
. . Two Summers . . . Intramurals, 5 in a row . . . 
Starfruckers, 156ers, Spikers,^Fast Breaks . . . 
Football Cards etc . . . Jack Dempsy . . . Disco . . 
. Baby Blue . . . Dillies . . . Paul ^ Will 4-12 . . 
. Cafeteria People . . . Fred & Maintenance . . . 
Four year people are the best . . . what is it . . . 
Alumni . . . The real world if I wasn't already in it . 
. . Time is on my side . . . 






"You can say I want to be free; 
I can say someday I will be . . 
James Taylor 



Jerome K. Holloway 

Chemistry, Physics 
Biology 




Hold fast to dreams, for if 
dreams die, life is a broken- 
winged bird that cannot fly 



After awhile you learn 
the subtle differences between holding a 
hand and chaining a soul. 
And you learn that love doesn't mean leaning 
And company doesn't always mean security. 
And you begin to learn 
that kisses aren't promises 
and you begin to accept your defeats 
with your head up and your eyes ahead, 
with the grace of a woman, not the grief of a 
child. 
And you learn 

to build your roads on today 
because tomorrow's ground is too uncertain for 

plans. 
And futures have a way of falling down in 

midflight 
After awhile you learn 
that even sunshine burns if you ask too much 
So you plant your own garden and decorate your 

own souf 
Instead of waiting for someone to bring you 
flowers. ^^j y^^ ,^^^1^ 

that you really can endure 
that you really are strong 
And that you really do have worth. 
■^ And you learn 

And you learn with every goodbye 
you learn. 



Ruth-Ellen Burack 
Biology 





Richard Edward Lawson 
Biology 



Curry College Pains Versus The Pleasures: 
BENTHAN holds that every man is directly aware of his own 
pleasures and pains, but only indirectly aware of the plea- 
sure and pains of others, it follows as a logical neccessity 
that each person is the best judge of his own happiness. 
PLEASURES: Basketball, Choff, H.Hayes, -good times, 
Florida, Rooms 30,22,5_, home. Championships, -good 
times, Tram, Jack, Learning Center, -good times. 
PAINS: Exams, term papers, food, early classes and study- 
ing. 




Clark Samuel Linehan 
Biology 




,9(1 -persons. 
iCxxf \.tr\^f-e/^\a<i Ii7 uoor ouin ccrett. 





AT DAY'S END 
If you sit down at set of sun 
and count the acts that you have done, 
And, counting, find 
One self-denying deed, one word 
That eased the heart of him who heard- 
One glance most kind. 
That fell like sunshine where it went- 
Then you may count that day well spent 



But if through all the livelong day. 
You've cheered no heart, by yea or nay- 
If through it all 

You've nothing done that you can trace 
That brought the sunshine to one face- 
No act most small 

That helped some soul and nothing cost- 
Then count that day as worse than lost. 
-George Eliot (1819-1880) 





Sheree Bernard! 
Communications 



COMMUNICATIONS 



James Brown 
Communications 



ACTIVITIES 
74-75, Men's Dormitory Council 
75-76, Dormitory President 
74-75, Dean's Task Force on Communication 
Spring 76, Orientation Committee 
73-74, Welfare Committee 

74, Currier-Times Reporter 

75, Feature Editor 

75, Assistant Editor 

76, Editor-in-Chief 
75, Traffic Court 

75, M.D.C. Constitution Revision Committee Chairman 





Robert B. Cox 

Communications 



"... Look to the sky 
everything happens for 
a reason - In your 
-life . . . '^ 
"Pablo Cruise 72" 



To the good people I've met, my 
friends and all the "strangers" 
along the way thanx for the pepper- 
oni, four good years. To those I 
don't see - Have a good life - 
Peace - Cox 




^ Richard Beach 

:'\^ Communications 

^^^ Minor- Secondary Education 








Brian Cutler 

Communications 
Government 



^^^^^^ ancee Chalifour Goober Snoober Bozo University of Missouri Communications 
^ y^ ^^ Mount Vernon Earl Tatum Gus Williams The Rookies Bob Smitty Smith Tom 
^^ ■ ■ Redheaded Wood tic Alcott Nick Bimbo Lettire Tom McGrath Tommy Decabia 

I m Doug Black Chris Walker Chris Jordan Drew Isreal Mark Cember Tom Gahr Stor- 
I ^^ min Norman Steve Medwid Coach Felix Smith Intramurals Football Champs 1975 
' ^*^ Varsity Baseball Second Base Centerfield League Champs National Batting 
Champs Paul Stumpy Levesque Rich Moran Randy Kohlenberger Chris Sheehan Lee Rubin 
Brian Vallely Marty Bisonette Collision Broken Arm Coach Jack Vallely Alexander Graham 
Bell Student Senate Bullshit Be Bop Bo Friends Ruth Lucas Carol Robbins Taryn McCarthy 
Lauri Remes Maureen Durkin Sara Shelton Sara Tucker Eileen Sheiner Marilyn Stiglitz 
Ronnie Ellle Ellen Lori Lisa Barbara Mayo Basement Statehouse Tish Rob Lawrence Peter 
Paulli Brian Cutler Steve McGinnity Mary Coleman Janet Torres Nora Smith Patti Cleary 
Janet Feeney Marty Silsby Donna Neri Steve McNeil The Pub Rob Pasquele Cary Tomlinson 
Unforgetable Lauri Kolpes Kolpan Marion Foley Rose Trainor Ross Burbank Bud Miller Jim 
O'Hare Jeff Rich Bill Bruce North Hall Go Wild Partying Pink Policeman 2 12 oz beers 12 
oz concentrated pink lemonade vodka to taste St. Patricks Day The Lep Show me Nothing 
Maintenance Summer 76 Fred Phil Eddy Lino Nando Pat Donovan Ben Mark Birchall Jim 
Kirk Petunia Fun Tequila Stereo's JBL Pioneer Dbx Gunhill Road Heidi C. Franke Publicity 
Carnival Peer Teach Interpersonal George Wharton WMLN News Director Infirmary Ricker 
Miller Mike Asher Tim Lewis Mrs Grela Mott Cafeteria Nausea Joe Baboza Edie Denise Doc 
Fop Gates Pat North Ruth Burack Yearbook Carl Scheig Warren Bazirgan Andie Negro Ed 
Henderson Pooch Italia Miller Beer Spa Amtrack Don Grovenor Trevor Body Language In- 
tramural Basketball Champs 1977 Palmela Skip Eleanor Hank Jude Give me a Break Kevin 
Keating Milton Hilton Dean Bob Capillio moron cretin Student Protest Randy Kupferberg 
Conference Center Impersonations Parents Weekend Chairperson Six Five Two Forty Five 
Bubba Holmes Meg Linda Greg Little Dana Meyers Tom Fair Main House Jay Varga Laura 
Daley Murph Steve Karmelin McKlinsky Pickell Cioffi Nate Jeff Lowe Bob Cox Baby You 
Do Send Me Zactley's Who's Who Homecoming Spring Weekend Loaded Deans List Scott 
Wilson Sharon Ferruci Kate Sharon Goldmeier Teddy Al Barbara Syracuse Danzers Jim Kirk 
Krebs Dave Foster John DeJesu Deja Vu Believe Me Marty Scherilas Willis Humongous 
Veeerrryyy Bad Boston Celtics Christos Mollys Later Much Disco Party Clark Linehan 
McCann Roger Allen Bump The Trampps Yankees Scholars A Jack Lemly Hannibal Hayes 
Sandy Neufeld Hype Sam Peto Janice Kit Tommy Haugh Barnes Pam Joe Tenuta Doughboy 
Pro Keds and all the other persons, places, and things I may not have mentioned here, but 
that surely I'll never forget . . . 



Gary Leopold 
Communications 





Jody Gustin 
Communications 







Donald G. Godbout 

Communications 
Broadcasting 





"I never allowed Curry to interfere with my education 
Where little was needed to the imagination 
Never do today what you can do tomorrow 
Thank God it's over, and no more sorrow" 




. . . Nothing more can be attempted that to establish the beginning and 
the direction of an infinitely long road . . , 

George Simmel 



The one great regret I will always 
carry with me is that at Curry College 
I never had the opportunity to sing 
"Boolah, Boolah." 

Unknown 



Life is like creamed asparagus. 
Unknown 




Jeff Lowe 
Communications 




OATmJZAL 

I 





t. 




CASXMO 



Richard L. Naran 
Communications 




^pni^*^ 


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^^SR .a0Tr>\. w 


f 


/( * ' 


\ 




'i 



Christopher R. Cardozo 
Economics 



It is not enough merely to exist . . 
You must do something more. 
Seel( always to do some good 
Somewhere ... for remember you don't 
Live in a world all your own. 
Your brothers are here too. 
Every man has to seek in his own way 
To make his own self more noble and 
To realize his own true worth. 

A. Schweitzer 



ECONOMICS 



Rick Rendon 





-isi'-^"' 



How queer everything is to- 
day! And yesterday things 
went on just as usual. I won- 
der if I've been changed in 
the night? Let me think: Was 
I the same when I got up this 
morning? I almost think I can 
remember feeling a little dif- 
ferent. But if I'm not the 
same, then the next question 
is, who in the world am I? 
Ah, that's the great puzzle! 







Albert Shutts 
Economics 





Barbara Kraussman Ahearn 
Elementary Education 



came back home today 
bringing parts of you with me 

If I had my way, all of you would 
be here 

I knew it wouldn't happen 
so I memorized your face 
before we said good bye 

Just so I could spend these 
days smiling 



EDUCATION 



Joyce Compagnone 
Elementary Education 






'Xnauj-Ledq.e and JtimheA. 
'OhjoaldrL' t be nvmch u^ed 
ujvtLL -t/i«y, CMS -oea^anjed, 

O-LLueA. UendeAA Holme/i 



Nancee Chalifour 

Elementary Education 
Communications/theatre arts 





'^unJAtUe. 



X LEFT My HEAD Som£U)t^EP£ TOOAy < 

TOT IT 7)0U)N FOR JOST A MlNi^TE . 

Ut40ER TMETABt-Ei 

ON A CHAIR 7 

UJiSH X M/if S ABL£ 70 SA"/ QHERjE • 





Janice Demers 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



God has given me this day to do as I will. 

I can waste it or use it for good. 

What I do today is very important, 

Because I am trading a day in my life for it. 

When tomorrow comes, this day will be gone forever. 

Leaving behind something I traded for it 

I want it to be gain, not loss . . . 

Good, not evil 

Success, not failure 

In order that I should never forget 

The price I paid for it. 

Gale Sayers 




Maureen Ann DeRoche 

Elementary Education 
Early Childhood 
Minor: Sociology 





Don't walk in front of me 

I may not follow 
Don't walk behind me 

I may not lead 
Walk beside me 

And just be my friend 



Albert Camus 




Debra Dusek 
Education 



If I could have the world for my schools 
I would learn to read every living thing, 
And only Nature would teach me rules. 
From her children I could learn how to sing. 
And from her junkyards to her endless seas 
I'd learn to feel. I'd learn to see and hear 
Just by walking through a garden of trees. 
Everything I'd want to know would be near. 
I'd ask my questions anytime at all, 
And speak all my feelings in my own way. 
And each new day would be a magazine 
Recording things we sometimes push away. 
I'd rather learn from what my mind has seen 
Outside - than inside walls of sickly grey. 
So I'll try to move out of the old maze 
And learn my own lessons in my own ways. 

Mary Picinski 




Alyce Fell 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 




Anne Fiedler 

Elementary Education 
Psychology 




The Little Things 

The little things 

Are most worthwhile 

A quiet word, 

A look, a smile, 

A listening ear 

That's quick to share 

Another s thoughts, 

Another's care . . . 

Though sometimes they may seem 

Quite small. 

These little things 

"lean most of ah 

largaret Lindsey 




To the people I've learned to love; 

As today can't reveal the mystery of tomorrow 
But in passing will grow older every day. 
Just as all is born a new 
We have now started on our way. 

Just as time knew to move on since the beginning, 
and the seasons know exactly when to change, 
We will all find our pathway to the future 
Never forgetting the friendships we have gained. 

Marion Foley 




Marion Foley 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



h^ s4^ 



"Some days up ahead will come 

down empty 
And some years fuller then the 

fullest we've known. 
Sometimes I feel I've always 

been just passing through 
On my way - away or toward 
A life just past and just beginning 
We've learned so much, Everything 

it seems but, how to stay 

in touch . . . 

Moment to moment each of us try 
Catching the cloud that holds 
back the sky." 





Christine Grady 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Biology 







Midge Finch 
Elementary Education 



Sometime in our life 
We all have pain, 
We all have sorrow. 
But if we are wise; 
We know that there's 
Always tomorrow. 



It takes both 
rain and sunshine 
to make a rainbow. 



To learn and never 
be filled is wisdom; 
To teach and never 
be weary is love. 



To know someone here or there 
with whom you can feel there is 
understanding in spite of distances 
or thoughts unexpressed . . . 
That can make this earth a garden. 

Friendship is the only cement 

that will ever hold the world together. 



Let us be the first to give a friendly 

sign. 
To nod first, smile first, speak first, 

and°- 
if such a thing is necessary, forgive 

first. 



The only real mistake 
is the one from which 
we learn nothing. , 




Christine Marion Freitas 

Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Psycnology 




The only way to have a friend is to be one. 
A real friend is a person with whom you dare to be 
yourself. When you have made a fool of yourself, 
do not feel that you have done a permanent job. 
He is one who knows all about you and still likes 
you. A friend is a present you give to yourself. 

We do not remember days, 
We remember moments. 

A long life is barely enough for a man and a woman to under- 
stand each other; ana to be understood is to love. The man who 
understands one woman is qualified to understand pretty well ev- 
erything. In living one learns from experience. In loving one 
learns from understanding. 





Helene Gelberg 

Elementary Ed 
bderate Special Needs 



A iaisWIote gxm She tSimlTM 



-\^-v^ >^ -v^ ^ v^.v.^.v V V V V V V \^ ^ V V ^sr^sr^sr^r,^ 



"A TIME IT WAS. 

AND WHAT A TIME IT WAS, 

IT WAS 

A TIME OF INNOCENCE, 

A TIME OF CONFIDENCES. 

LONG AGO IT MUST BE 

I HAVE A PHOTOGRAPH. 

PRESERVE YOUR MEMORIES. 

THEY'RE ALL THATS LEFT YOU." 

PAUL SIMON 



Susan Kupferberg 
Elementary Education 





Carol Anne Labo 

Elementary Education 
Early Childhood 



I HAVEN'T SEEN YOU IN A WHILE 
YET I OFTEN IMAGINE 
ALL YOUR EXPRESSIONS 

I HAVEN'T SPOKEN TO YOU RECENTLY 
BUT MANY TIMES 
I HEAR YOUR THOUGHTS 

GOOD FRIENDS MUST NOT ALWAYS 

BE TOGETHER 
IT IS THE FEELING OF ONENESS 

WHEN DISTANT 
THAT PROVES A LASTING 

FRIENDSHIP 

SUSAN POLIS SCHUTZ 



Eleanor Manin 
"ellie" 

Elementary Education 
yioderate Special Needs 




138 







Crvi u)Kcn vjou> V-iave-Wj... 
be loKo ^^ou ma8 + 



I 

o 



FRIENDSHIP 

Friendship is giving with 

no thought of recieving. 

It's being sincere and in 

sincerity believing. 

It's someone to talk to 

and someone talking to you. 

It's telling and hearing 

what is true. 

It's refusing to believe 

that bad exists. 

It's knowing that when not 

around you are missed. 

It's trying to help anyway 

you can even if it's only 

to understand. 

It's willingness to learn 

how to give more. 

It's getting it done 

without keeping score. 

It's trusting in faith 

each and every day. 

It's knowing you rate in a 

very special way. 



TRUE LOVE 

True love given as a prom- 
ise, never broken. 
In a moment of anger, bit- 
ter words are left unspoken. 
It's forgiving, forgetting 
what you forgave. 
It's each others pride con- 
sidered to save. 
It's knowing of when one is 
lost and in doubt. 
It's believing together you 
will figure it out. 
It's a comfort and strength 
you gain from your love, 
and your guiding light. 
It's ner smile saying 
"Thank God your here." 
It's his smile answering 
her unspoken prayer. 
It's the dreams of all the 
tomorrows yet to be. 
It's your future carefully 
planned, making it a reality. 
The rewards are many when 
your love is true. 
It's one whispering that 

I Love You. 




Elementary Education 
Early Childhood 




"And think not you can direct the course of love, 
for love, if it finds you worthy, directs your course. " 

"God allows heartbreak so man will learn to trust him." 

"Kindness is a language which the deaf and the blind can read. 



Helen Mary Maroon 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



I believe in the sun, 

even when it is not shining, 

I believe in love, 

even when I am alone, 

I believe in God,, 

even when He is silent. 

"Life takes people apart and in this separation it brings them together 
in a closeness not realized before." 

"Despair doubles our strength. " 

' 'We seldom marry where hearts lie." 

"A baby is God's opinion that the world should go on. " 





Susan Marcia Damberg 

Elementary Education 
VIoderate Special Needs 




Renaissance 
Ashes are Bui-ning 

Travel the days of freedom 
Roads leading everywhere 
Come with me now, and show how you 
care 

Follow the dying embers 

Cross on the paths they lay 

Breath of the past, the earths yesterday 

Colours are fading starlight 

Silver the way to find 

Walking the shadows, there in our mind 

Changing the order slowly 
Leaving the mist of time 
Fingers are holding 
fragments of mine 

Chorus; 

Clear you mind, maybe you will find 

that the past is still turning 
Circles sway, echo yesterday 
Ashes burning, ashes burning 

Imagine the burning embers 
They glow below and above 
Your sins you won't remember 

find all you'll find there is love 
Ashes are burning brightly 
The smoke can be seen from afar 
So now you're seeing how far 
Ashes are burning the way 



Siw,^ je' t,^ jkV* — ,,(iai>. 







Paul J. O'Rourke 

Elementary Education/ 
Moderate Special Needs 



In my young years you had the patience 
through your love to understand 
building your son's self-confidence 
to become a gentle man 




BUTTONS 




V?*" 



./ 




Richard Moran 

Elementary Education/ 
Moderate Special Needs 



■9* "^T -N 




.] A::.. 





Travel, Theatre CHILDREN, LOVE 
TEACHING, TOGETHER, FRIENDS, 

Music was my first love 
And it will be my last 
Music of the future 
And music of the past 
To live without my music 
Would be impossible to do 
In this world of trouble 
My music pulls me through 

John Miles 



.^e 



Maxine Beth Namerow 

Elementary Education 

\/loderate Special Needs 

Music 



^0 









Marshall Dean Tally 
Elementary Education 






I can't say it hasn't been fun. 
I know what I want to achieve and 
will possess the knowledge to 
reach my goal. I'm not afraid to 
make mistakes. 





We walked along the 

pathfoads filled with 

joy. 
You are a carefree 

woman. 

I am a humble boy. 
This is a special day in 

our lives never to be 

rearranged. 
We stop to rest in silence, 

begin to laugh, and 
realize 

we'll never change. 





Pamela Silevitch 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 





The year's at the spring, 
And day's at the morn; 
"ornlng's at seven; 
The hill-side's dew-pearled; 
The lark's on the wing; 
The snail's on the thorn; 
God's in His heaven - 
All's right with the World! 



From "Pippa Passes' 
By Robert Browning 
1841 




Penny Lou Pemberton 
Elementary Education 






Patricia Rogan 

Elementary Education 
/loderate Special Needs 



We're finished forever - a million people have said of a rela- 
tionship during difficult times and nine hundred and ninety nine 
thousand of them have changed their minds. There is no love to 
waste in this world and it would be silly to hastily discard what 
has been a cherished relationship, 

Every relationship ends and begins many times before it be- 
comes stable, if it ever becomes stable. 

Even waving physical attractiions can be restored if two people 
are patient and honest with each other. 

Love moves in cycles: passion sometimes becomes affection, 
affection can become irritation, irritation can turn to laughter, 
laughter to tears, tears can become kisses and turn to snarls or 
lead to more kisses. It's worth waiting to see not only what love 
was and is, but also what it is becoming. To decide an affair is 
over on the basis of a temporary lapse in affection or passion may 
be a misunderstanding of the rythms, the dynamic gulfing of love. 



Janice Tomkinson 

Elementary Education 
Minor: Music 






Q,^^^<^ L^ Jjyi^£. J*-ie 



f. 







We laughed 

We cried 

We shared 

all the entities that life holds for us. 

Our love, greater than words could 

describe snail become only a 
dream of remembrance 
For our future reminicient hours 

A communication so strong 

shall never fade. 

From "our" backyard 

to the Chicago Lakes 

to the New York Metro 

to peaceful Connecticut. 
Our friendship shall conquer all. 
We love each other Robin Vigdor 



Robin Vigdor 

English 

Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Minor: Psychology 





Rosemary Trainor 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



Meaning: The beginning 
of great love. Joy, con- 
tentment. Productive- 
ness, fertility. Beauty 
and Pleasure. A remind- 
er that when the mind is 
filled with Spirit, the 
Spirit will fill the mate- 
rial cup to overflowing. 



ACE 
OF 

CUPS 





What you can hold 
in your hand is 
never as precious 
as what you can 
hold in your 
heart. 



Kathleen Hammond Wilson 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 





Kathy Cassidy 



Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



ary Beth Lane 



Elementary Education 

Moderate Special Needs 

Psychology 



Jan Callis 
Elementary Education 




Laurie Kolpan 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 



Whether I shall turn 
out to be the hero of 
my own life or whether 
that station will be 
held by anybody else 
these pages must show. 
To begin my life with 
the beginning of my 
life I record that I 
was born, 

David Copperfield - 

CHARLES DICKENS 




Kitty Richards 
Art Education 




Debra Bostwick 
Elementary Education 




Jan McTaggart 

Elementary Education 
Fine Arts 




I 



Andrea Quinn Santoro 

Elementary Education 
Moderate Special Needs 




Heidi C. Franke 
Fine Arts 



The final lines of the play were being spoken now, and then it came — an explosive 
crash of applause as the curtain fell. It came like a thunderclap, full and tumultuous. I 
tried to disengage myself and measure the kind of applause it was, but I could not, it 
sounded like hit applause to me, and it was keeping up. Except for one or two critics with 
early deadlines dashing up the aisle, the entire audience was remaining in its seats and 
keeping the curtain going up and down. The cast stood bowing and smiling — they had 
taken their individual calls and the entire company was lined up on the stage. No other 
calls had been set, and the company yvas bowing and smiling and somewhat awkwardly 
now, in the way actors do when they are no longer in the frame of the play; but still the 
applause showed no sign of diminishing. 

To my amazement, I saw Mr. Kaufman step forward and signal the stage manager to 
keep the curtain up. I stared at the stage in disbelief. He was about to do something so 
implausible that I could hardly conceive of his doing it -- he was about to make a curtain 
speech. I could not believe my eyes. More than once he had expressed his scorn for au- 
thors who make opening-night speeches, and he had expressed it in such scathing terms 
that it seemed impossible that he was about to make one himself. The audience seemed 
almost as surprised as I was. The applause stilled immediately and an eager "Shushing" 
took its place. He came forward another step, peered at them over his glasses and waited 
for complete quiet. 

"I would like this audience to know," he said carefully and slowly, "That eighty per 
cent of this play is Moss Hart." That was all. He stepped back and signaled to the stage 
manager to lower the curtain. The audience was bewildered for a full moment and then 
broke into perfunctory applause. They had expected a witty speech in the manner of the 
play — or in the caustic tradition of George S. Kaufman. The disappointment and their 
lack of interest in what he said was clear, but they obligingly applauded for another cur- 
tain. 

I stood staring at the stage and at George Kaufman. Generosity does not flower easily or 
often in the rocky soil of the theatre. Few are uncorrupted by its ceaseless warfare over 
credit and billing, its jealousies and envies, its constant temptations toward pettiness and 
mean-spiritedness. It is not only a hard and exacting profession, but the most public one 
as well. It does not breed magnanimity, and unselfishness is not one of its strong points. 
Not often is a young playwright welcomed into it with a beau geste as gallant and selfless 
as the one that had just come over those footlights. 

A hand was tugging at my sleeve and Max Siegel was whispering some words in my ear, 
but I moved quickly away without answering. I did not trust my voice and I was ashamed 
to have him see that my eyes were blurred. 

From; ACT ONE — THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MOSS HART 



FINE ARTS 



Terrie Lee Romano 
Fine Arts 






FUN DAYS 

FILLED WITH SIMPLE PLEASURES 

DAYS I'LL ALWAYS TREASURE 

OLD DAYS, 

IN MY MIND AND IN MY HEART TO STAY 




VaOuoL -L aot seen -me sun 







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i\|^Ww?A to Ciet-kMtii 





3(1(2 how" UOIW dVCIVWw 
of VV\^ COVMf Ui/^, 



INTERDISCIPLINARY 

\louVji (lot to mi 
all tUf kjvjz Ht 

Jk^W. ^O^l^l^ (]0)tW(V 

LjOuV(^ b^utijul, 
i)ouV(t bwvutfjut/ 
06 uow jg,^l. ^ 




Ellen Small 

Sociology/Psychology 
Anthropology 




To: Mom, Dad, Nana, Julia 
JR. LB, KB, EA, CC, PL, 
AL, PH, PF, LH, ED, AF, 
DA, LS, NECC, LN, JN & 
EW, SD, AB, LG, JEN & 
LYNN, MC, JW. 

Maria T, F, Bacigalupo 
Behavioral Sciences 




149 




Penny Ann Powell 
English 



M_y years at Curry were unforgetable ones and full of memories I 
will always cherish. The friends I made here are warm, genuine 
and dependable - always there when I needed them. To Adair, 
Kandi and Bindy, I now join you in the busy life of the "cold, 
cruel world." To Anne, Michael and Robin, I hope you all have 
much happiness and achieve whatever goals you have set before 
you. To Karen, Jane, Alicia, Ellie, etc., please make the most 



college education (in all senses ot the word!;. And finally, thank 
you, Robbie (better known as Roz), for making my life beautiful 
and full of love. I am pleased and proud to walk with you as a fel- 



low graduate and a loving wife. 



"Even knowing that none of us can catch up with himself we are 
making a run for it. Love, we are making a run." Maxine Kumin 



Kim Hayes Desmond 
English 




ENGLISH 




larcia Corey 
Education 



ichael Coppola 
Education 




Kl< 




Thanks to: Patti, Sue, 
Clark, Marty R., Ross, Ter- 
ry, Stephen F., John H., 
Girls 1st Floor Scholars C 
'76, Good Chinese Food. 
Debbie, Faith 8. Gaby, Mrs. 
Wilder, Eric, Ruth S., Baz, 
T.E.P. 



GOVERNMENT 



Theodore M. Gallant 
Ted 

Government 

Dark Room Lab Assistant 

Public Relations Photo Aid 



BER??? 



Tex? Who's Tex? HE calls himself a cook? 
Why do they call Lombard "the zoo?" 
Hey, they really expect us to work in 
tiiese classes — I thought you said it was a 
cinch . . . what do you mean the school is 
changing? 

— Uh, I passed . . . wasn't THAT tough 
after all. 

Think I'll transfer- if I can do it here I can 
do it anywhere-right? I mean after all ev- 
eryone else is, so what the hell. No, thats a 
copout, if this school is getting better, why 
not stay with it? One more year anyway. 
Besides, there are some good people here. 
Gonna get out of the 200 anyway. 
~ Jesus, a lot of people didn't come back 
. . . maybe I shouldn't have come back ei- 
ther. Wish Tex & Co. HAD left! Why can't 
they do something about it? WHY IS EV- 
ERY ONE so APATHETIC?!! Hey, what do 
they MEAN limiting our parties? What we 
do on our own time is our business. Don't 
sink the good ship! 

— Where did all of these tennis courts 
come from? and that Pool! Welcome to 
Curry's summer resort. Boy it's fun being 
treated as hired help. 

— Hey, they actually kicked a few kids out 
for flunking last year! Curry is really get- 
ting there. Why am I taking Economics? 
Because I'm a masochist, thats why. What 
happened to all of the Govt, courses any- 
way? What am I going to do when I get out 



of here-only one year left. Why should we 
have to pay for the soccer nets? Why 
doesn't the P.E. dept. try to help us? Oh, if 
it's not football, it's not worth it? We'll 
see. — Another summer at Curry. God, 
North Hall is like a 200, cats, dogs, birds, - 

— probably a gorrilla in the basement. -- 
One last time, then I can finally finish with 
this. ME take CALCULUS? What the hell, 
maybe I'll learn math yet. Party Rules? 
What is this, who does lie think he is- who 
does he think WE are? Let's have a mass 
meeting, maybe they'll listen. Attrition, 
attrition, attrition, thats all we hear about, 
but what are they doing to keep us here? 
Running a summer camp is no way to run a 
college. Lets form a committee. Lets form 
another committee. Why don't we form a 
committee? Oh, we did? Why haven't they 
done anything yet? Definition of a com- 
mittee: Any living animal with more than 
one mouth and no brain. Why don't we just 
forget about committees and talk to the 
Trustees who knows, maybe they will listen 

— hell, they'll have to, what with the at- 
trition the way it is. Chancellor- the first 
at Curry since Alexander Graham Bell. 
Maybe now we can get somewhere. 

— Found a job yet? Me neither but some- 
thing's gotta go right eventually. 

Hey, I just got a bill for deposit for next 
semester — are they trying to tell me 
something?? 



Carl Scheig 
Government 





Bruce A. Tagrin 
Government 



My greatest inspiration is a challenge 
to attempt the impossible. 




The greatest pleasure in life is doing 
what people say you cannot. 



Mary Shole 
Government 





Paul Biller 
Government 



Ira Besdansky 
Government 




Tomashefsky! Artist great! 
No praise is good enough for you! 
Of all the stars you remain the king 
You seek no tricks, no false quibbles; 
One sees truth itself playing, 
Your appearance is godly to us 
Every movement is full of grace 
Pleasing is your every gesture 
Sugar sweet your every turn 
You remain the king of the stage 
Everything falls to your feet. 



President of Cinema Club, 

Not absent in Four Years at Curry. 




Anthony DiGennaro 
History 



HISTORY 



Marie Durkin 
History 



IT SEEMS TO ME WE CAN NEVER GIVE UP LONGING AND WISHING 
WHILE WE ARE THOROUGHLY ALIVE. THERE ARE CERTAIN THINGS 
WE FEEL TO BE; BEAUTIFUL AND GOOD, AND WE MUST HUNGER 
AFTER THEM. 

- GEORGE ELIOT - 






Kevin Janet U ,/ 

Political and Historical 
Studies 

(jrci tL (.act ij)st SC^vvta it dltvti^^ ,yt(<s <5 pa^'7' '^ '?''^?St^. 1^ ^j\ _^ 
/^^-^i/tx . hs^iiut^ alt a^ tM^^ T^ u€. hcui^ a. laif a^ 3- $axi^ 



T:^. 



"i-i-jd i;;-^.:>' 



Robert Ponticello 






If I only knew a year ago what I know today, 
I could have loved the ones who loved me so. 
But I'm an older man now and I see things 
differently than yesterday. 
For tomorrow is another day and 
I'll see things in yet another way. 
If I only knew a month ago what I know today 
A broken-heart wouldn't be so painful 
But I'm an older man now and I see things 
differently than yesterday. 
For tomorrow is another day and 
I'll see things in yet another way. 
If I only knew a week ago what I know today, 
I could have used time in another way. 
But if I knew everyday like I know today, 
I would have no tomorrows or yesterdays! 

MANAGEMENT 




Richard John Clifford 
Business Management 



lichael Cohen 



Management 
Psychology 



When an evil man plans to hurt a good man, 

his heart is cruel, his plans are well laid Be firm in your 

out, and his actions are firm; therefore the ^^^.g ^g gggy 

gentleman seldom escapes. When a good man j^ yQ^,. \^Q^f\_. 

intends to punish an evil man his heart is ^g sj-^jqi- ^\{^ 

kind, his plans are incomplete and he cannot yourself but be 

carryout this evil force; therefore he is often GENTLE with 

victimized by his own inaction. However, OTHERS' 
this inaction can change evil intentions into 
good intentions. 




Paul Levesque 
Business Management 




"Why buy the cow when you 
can get the milk for noth- 
ing!" 




Omotunde A. Adeyinka 
Management 







Coming to grips with 
problems, frustration 
and misfortune, have 
changed my illusion 
into reality. Knowing 
this, all I can say is 
that I am glad that this 
is over. 

IN HONOR OF MR. 8c 
MRS. ADEYINKA: 



It is one thing for one to be ambitious, and it is another thing to re- 
ceive adequate financial and moral support from parents. 

To this I've been one of the fortunate ones. 

The praise should be given to my parents who gave me the rightful 
support throughout my career life at Curry. 



FAREWELL CLASS OF 1977 
by Virginia Thomas 

These days the Seniors are as busy as bees. There is so much to do to prepare for graduation. 
Invitations are being sent out in all directions. Caps and gowns have been picked up and the 
Seniors have eagerly tried them on. Now they must be pressed and cleaned to ready them for 
Baccalaureate and graduation. Other practices have been for the purpose of teaching us how to 
walk down the aisle for Baccalaureate to graduation. 

Some Seniors are doing term papers, reports or speeches. Exams will soon have to be taken 
and then just about everything will be over for the Senior. 

Last minute plans are being made to check into another college, higher degrees in majors. 

Graduation will end a very important time in our lives. This was a time for learning, devel- 
oping, and growing. It was, and is a very important period to each senior, but we can't stop 
time and stay where we are, even though we love this period of our lives dearly. We must move 
on to accept our role in the world, and do our job, whatever it may be, to the best of our abili- 
ty. 

This does not mean that the Class of 1977 will die when May, 1977 is gone. When a group of 
people have been together for four years, laugh together, cry together, and helped each other 
through every situation -good and bad- then the feelings and thoughts that each member of the 
class holds precious cannot be destroyed. The Class of 1977 will live on forever because each 
and every member of the class wants it to. 

When we walk out the doors of Curry College as graduates, we will say goodbye to these 
things that we love, but we will be looking forward to a bright future with a heart full of happy 
memories. 





•^W^^ 


„! 


'§jKKm 


^ 


w0^^ ^'^'^^S^^^^^B^^k 


n 


[ ^-^ ,.^^11^1 


wt 


k '"^''^^H^l 


^ 






,,.*-w^- 



Virginia Thomas 
Business Management 



^s.^>^^V^VJ^^^V 




litchell Morris 
Management 



Charles Finn 
Management 





John Varga 
Jay 

Management 



Jeffrey Marr 
Management 








Thomas Fair 

Psychology 
Secondary Education 





J 



Dianne Fiske 
Psychology 



PSYCHOLOGY 



^'^ /-Ik L 






■:' r 






t. ■««/ 

V, 



a 



A MEMORY 
Long ago is not so far away 
It's close as thought 
And near as memory 
Jogged by a souvenir, 
Stirred by a keepsake 
From days that used to be. 






'cje) 








Why should we be in such desperate haste to succeed and in such des- 
perate enterprises? If a man does not keep pace with his companions, 
perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the 
music which he hears, however measured or far away. 






^'%) 



Ronald Kozel 
Psychology 




Richard G. Plunkett 
Psychology 





Margery Gravel le 
Psychology 



John Pierce 
Psychology 




Barbara Love 
Psychology 



SOCIOLOGY 



Sally Bazirgan 
Sociology 




ON LEAVING 
A long road lies ahead 
a road behind is paved 
The road ahead's uncertain 
as the power of ocean's waves 
The knowledge now behind me 
will guide me thru the days 
The knowledge to discover 
Will guide me in my ways. 



/ 



What is this torn foolery? I suppose it's been offered as 
my shot at immortality, but can you expect me to sum up 
the reasons for my existence in one sloshy, sentimental- 
ly retarded sentence for the pubescent puBlic to ponder? 



/ 




Judy Gordon 
Sociology 



:^^ 



Cl 








Karl Tomlinson 
Sociology 





Jeanne Harrison 
Sociology 



"Some people are going to like me 


and some people aren't, so 1 


might as well be me. Then 


at least 1 will know that 


the people who like me, 


like me." 


Hugh Prather 





Gary Kruger 
Sociology 




"MuMtu-^r^^^' 







BURGER 

KING 




\T 



(^TTINGDOWN 




FINALIY! ^%^ 



(/■^' 











Janet Lee 
Sociology 





'Old deu^s-.. 

oood ^lOis X rexvewbtr 
Fon dOius ' 

r(\e»noriies • . ■ 



Making friends for the world to see 
Let the people know you got what you need 
With a friend at hand you will see the light 
If your friends are there, then everything's 
alright. 



Janice Ellen Stanovich 

Sociology 
Psychology, French 





It gives me great pleasure to be a part of my 
graduating class. When I think back to earlier 
days, I thank those people who gave me the in- 
centive to continue my education; Bill, 1972; 
Janet, forever; Bruce, always; Gary, swell kid; 
Jamie, remember me; and most of all Ken, my 
partner for life. 



larilyn Edith Sandberg 
Sociology 



Timothy Casey 
Sociology 



Barry Belt 
Sociology 




Kathleen O'Sullivan 
Sociology 






David Bean 
Math and Science 



MATH & SCIENCE 



NOT PICTURED 
Michael J. Asher 
David Barry 
Eric Dwight Bens 
Susan Marie Bragg 
Ann E. Klein Brown 
Yolanda Alicia Cavallini 
Maureen F, Defonzo 
George E. Gardner 
Sharon E. Hebert 
DebraK. Hilton 
Grayson H. Holly 
Henry S. Holstein 
Carole L. Leonard 
Deborah Ann Malchman 
Charles G. Maguire 
Craiq T. McConchie 
Gerald Joseph Nardone 
Vivian Beth Morse 



Linda S. Nunn 
Frank O'Neil 
Panya Permpanich 
Joel Robert Plattor 
Joseph Francis Reid 
Douglas Richards 
Carol Richmond 
Isaac Wavne Rutledge 
Eleanor Spinney 
Helena Mary Stern 
James R. White 
Ann Jean Zmudsky 
Sheila Kay Duggan 
Annette M. DiDorio 
Nancy Kay LaFortunte 
Lisa Lynne Starr 
Mrs. Judith Warners 
Richard Armand Leco 



AND SO OUR SEASONS WENT ROUND AND 

ROUND . 

SENIOR WEEK 



It was our last week. We had made it 
through four years at Curry, but along the 
way we had lost a large portion of our 
class. A lot of them had been our friends 
and some we had hardly known. We, the 
Class of 1977, were about to spend our 
last week together sharing memories of 
the last four years. 




The campus was deserted. Most of 
our undergraduate friends had gone home 
for the summer. Some of them would re- 
turn, but many would not, and we all will 
look back at this yearbook and remember 
the times we had during 1976 and 1977. 
We have seen many changes and are 
graduating in the midst of even more, but 







we will find out that that is what life is all about. 

Most of us spent the weekend prior to senior week 
recovering from finals and attending many parties. We 
woke up Monday morning to clouds, rain, and SNOW! 
Our clambake was to be held at Nantasket Beach on 
Bruce Tagrin's beach property. We weren't expecting 
snow, and we had our clambake in the Drapkin Center 
where we had to imagine waves, sand, and sun. 

The weather began to improve, and on Tuesday we 
moved to Lombardos' of East Boston. The Band would 
have been more appropriate at a wedding, but we did get 
them to play some Disco. Jack Nash sang for us and we 
all enjoyed the open bar! The weather was trying to co- 
perate, but our Steak Cook-Out by the pool was reloca- 
ted to Westhave Park, Nice, but not quite like eating 
steak poolside. 





On Thursday it was off to Medevil Manor where 
Paul O'Rourke enjoyed a loaf of bread, Scott Wilson 
disappeared, and jokes, food and drink abounded. It 
was getting closer to graduation and the week was 
winding down. People were beginning to realize that 
it was almost the end. . .we were all eager to get out, 
but still hesitant because we were leaving a lot 
behind. 

President and Mrs, Hafer invited us into their 
home for a Cocktail Party before our Buffet at the 
Pub on Friday. Mrs. Hafer showed us around and 
gave us the historical background to many items in 
the house. They were getting ready to entertain the 
Trustees, and the Platform Party which included 
Cleveland Amory. Mr, Amory was raised in the 
President's house, and People Magazine featured 
this in their June 6th issue. They also mentioned a 
little bit about our graduation. 

From the Cocktail Party we headed for the Buf- 
fet in the Pub, and for our last night together as a 
class. Saturday morning began early with a Cham- 
pagne Breakfast. Too bad someone forgot the Cham- 
pagne! Rehearsal. Grades. Are you really going to 
graduate? Even a D looked good. Renaissance Fair, 
Twelfth Night, Early to bed. Who could sleep? 



We each felt the end in our own ways and were 
anxious about Sunday and what was to follow. We 
were to begin learning again. We were to learn about 
life as a reality. The want ads would become re- 
quired reading, and most unpleasant. We would no 
longer be safe behind the walls of Curry College. . . 
behind four years of memories. . . Lombard with Jan 
Callis. ,the Library under construction. . promises of 
a scoreboard, .a new College Dean, .a few Main 
House parties, .streakers on St. Patricks Day.. the 
way the Senate used to be. .pennied doors and unus- 
ual showers in State House, .snowball fights and 
fraying at Blue Hills. .Homecoming Floats, .working 
on campus for the summer, .the Pub opening, .dances 
. .plays, .beer, .beer, ,beer. HoJo's burning down. . 
Booze Cruises, .and the maybe we studied and went 
to classes. We did it all! 




/ 1 



M. Namerow, Secretary, N. Chalifour, Vice-President, J. Gustin, 
President, A. Fiedler, Treasurer 




WE CAN'T RETURN. WE CAN ONLY LOOK BEHIND 



RENAISSANCE FAIR 



Sponsored by the Fine Arts Department 




i:«i7 






FRY COLLEGE PRESENTS 
SCENES FROM 



WILLIAM SHAKESPEAEE 





CAST 

Alan Hollingsworth .Captain 

Heidi C. Franke Viola 

Marianne Connelly Valentine 

Stephen Lundvall Orsino, 

Duke lllyria 

Barbara Love Maria, a 

gentlewoman 

Geoffrey Cambell Feste, a clown 

Patricia Platz Lady Olivia 

M. Connelly Lady in Waiting 

Bob Tomasello Malvolio 

Joseph Schneider ' Sir Toby Belch 

Kenneth Carberry Sir Andre Aguicheek 

Kevin Duff Sebastian 

Thorn Carroll Antonio 

A. Hollingsworth Priest 

Directed by: Kathleen McCann 
Musical Director: Ron Warners 




^/^/Z///^^//^^/'^^/ G^^^€(l^ 



ACADEMIC QUADRANGLE 



PROCESSIONAL 
NATIONAL ANTHEft/ 
INVOCATION 



lence please sland) 



1977 
'^'"-ry College 



GREETING 

CLASS ORATOR 
PRESENTATION OF CLASS GIF- 
COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS 



Cenief, Docfof o/ Humanhie 
rhe Hon Kevin B Harrington, I 

■Howard B lohn; 

Johnson Companv, Dociot 
\rthur D Kaizenberg. |t , Pj 

Doctor o/ Laws 









Jodv Elizabeth Gust 







^ 



CONFERRING OF DECREES 



lence please stand) 



g about thee. 





Kevin Harrington 

Doctor of Public Administration 



Howard Johnson 

Doctor of Laws 



Leonard Cronkhite 

Doctor of Humanities 




Arthur Katzenberg, Jr 

Doctor of Laws 



The weather was beautiful and the tent 
was beginning to fill up with our family 
and friends. The Processional was be- 
ginning and soon we were sitting in our 
seats. 

President Hafer greeted everyone; we 
were hearing speeches and it was going 
by so fast. Jody Gustin, Class Presi- 
dent, presented the Class Gift. She an- 
nounced that our gift was to come in two 
parts: we would donate money to the 
College's Grounds Development Fund 
which would use the money to pave the 
path by the gym, and when each one of 
us received our diploma we were to earn 
our first dollar because Jody presented 
each of us with a silver dollar. 

Before we knew it we were with our 
family and friends. It was time to say 
goodbye and to go our separate ways, 
but we will remember always . . . 
Graduation Day. 




Jeff Lowe 

Recipient of New Era Award 



I would like to welcome and thank everyone for coming today. I would also like to thank a very 
special group and that's my fellow classmates who elected me to be their class orator, for it is to the 
class of '77 that I am really speaking. This being such a successful and diverse class presented 
some gargantuan problems - like what subject to make my speech on. This was clouded by the fact 
that my mind was, and still is, trying to comprehend the fact that four years of college are now over, 
and that 16 or so years of formal education have bit the dust behind me. So what is my speech about 
- well it is about the future. For as college ends we are faced with the dilemma of what to do with 
our lives - many of us still unsure of which direction we wish to turn. We've already begun scouring 
over the want ads hoping for that big opportunity. Being in the right place at the right time. Some of 
us will be returning home with its dependence and its ensuing security. Others like myself will choose 
to go out on our own as we try to utilize our new found independence and education. The future will 
see us lose our student discounts, our Thursday nights will no longer be spent carousing at the Pub, 
and the government will replace Mrs. LeBaron as the person chiefly responsible for collecting our 
money. Curry College will also be facing the future. It will be filling two vacant dean positions and 
acquiring a new president. With the replacements will come new philosophies and new ideas that will 
enable Curry to move into a fresh and bright future. But why should my speech concentrate so heavily 



on the future when it's the present 
hopeful reality. This day com- 
study; it means we've successful- 
pressures, the tests and the pa- 
and the exhausting two and a 
Our diplomas signify that we've 
but more than that we've accom- 
meet and exceed certain stan- 
this diploma extends well beyond 
four years of life at Curry, and 
our diploma different from any 
for knowledge in the classroom 
commonality. After all, math is 
techniques vary from school to 
the same. What is not common to 
the people and events that have 
past. This is why our diploma is 
could they have had a past the 
could I have found Nancee Chali- 
and admire, and who has meant 
years. Nowhere else could be 
sire or superior skills of Paul 
No other campus featured Laurie 
managed to mobilize an entire 




that makes the future such a 
memorates our four years of 
ly conquered the work and the 
pers, the dreary 8:45 A.M. 
half hour 7:00 night classes, 
completed the requirements 
plished them well enough to 
dards. We must recognize that 
the classroom. It represents 
it's this aspect that makes 
other. A diploma given merely 
has inherent in it a certain 
math, and though teaching 
school, the material remains 
every school is the social life: 
helped form our all important 
so unique. For nowhere else 
same as ours. Nowhere else 
four who I have grown to love 
so much to me these last two 
found two athletes with the de- 
Levesque and Richie Moran. 
Kolpan or Marion Foley who 
student body when they be- 



lieved injustices were being done. Nowhere else could I have found friends like Tom, Smitty, Carol, 
Ruth, and the tens of others. Where else could I have encountered such a jovial Irishman as Pat Don- 
ovan, or workers like Lino and Nando, Edie, and Paul Jeanetti. Tell me where else could I have 
found professors Jack Holloway, Gertrude Webb, Fred Kirschenmann, Joe Finn, or Marvin Mandell? 
I'm proud to say I've found them all at Curry, and though you may have different names on your list, 
the idea remains the same, Curry has been so much a part of our lives for the past four years. There's 
so much to remember - bad times, good times, and never forget times. As we look around we can spot 
so many friends that are graduating - there are still more who have yet to graduate, I'm sure a lot of 
post-ceremony efforts will be made to get everyones address and phone number. Friends will say 
"keep in touch" or "see you soon", but there will be those people whom we will never hear from, nor 
ever see again. Some will be close, others merely aquaintances - yet they'll all still be remembered 
as friends. This is a beautiful but sad day. A parting of ways. It's a blend of the future, present, 
and wonderful past. A time to look ahead without forgetting how to look back. Today is a day we'll 
never forget, but more than that it is a reflection on the times we'll always remember. As college ends, 
I think back on a quote from a teacher who said, "knowledge is life with wings". With this in mind I 
urge us all to utilize our knowledge of the past and present, of experience, and friendship so that we 
may soar high in the skies of the future, darting among the clouds of success and rays of happiness 
I wish everyone the best of luck and the best of life 




Cleveland Amory 

Doctor Of Humane Letters 




Cleveland Amory, who was raised in the President's 
house, gave the main address at the Graduation Ceremonies. 
He talked about his growing up and especially about his ca- 
reer. Amory was a T.V. Guide critic and now writes a daily 
column. His special cause involves kindness to animals. 
Mr. Amory was a delightful addition to our Graduation, and 
brought us recognition all over the country. 





Front, Left To Right, Bruce Tagrin (Corresponding Secretary), Rick Rendon (Vice President), Jeff Tarleton (President), Bobbi 
Lees (Recording Secretary), Sam SInutts (Treasurer) Top, Carl Sciieig, Helene Gelberg, Chico LeBlanc, Ruth Lucas, Gary 
Leopold, Joanne Roderiques, Taryn McCarthy, Ginny Balchunas, Heather Ruhl, Jeb Killlon. Insert: Jody Gustin 



14TH STUDENT SENATE 



The Student Senate is the leading student group on campus. Elected by their peers, they are 
responsible for joint communication between students, faculty, and administration. 

The Senate also sponsors a wide variety of events by careful distribution of the student acti- 
vity fees. 



\\ N. 




The 14th and 15th Student Senates contributed highly to the benefit of us all. 

The 14th Senate brought with it respectability and consciousness. They were the first Senate 
to hold the line on budgets by not allowing organizations to exceed their allotments. No one can 
forget their head to head clashes with Mr. Goldrick or Mr. Stephens on how our money is spent. 
They also invented the Student Incentive Program and Student Allocations Program to help erase 
apathy within the student organizations. They also brought us rental refrigerators. 

The 15th Senate came into office in January full with inquisition. They dwelved into matters 
that concern our academics (the entire administrative leadership issue) and our stomachs (the 
cafeteria leadership issue). They developed the SIP-SAP programs, and sponsored the memorable 
All College Celebration. 



15TH STUDENT SENATE 



Bottom, Left To Right, Advisor Carl Cooper, Taryn IVIcCarthy (Recording Secretary), Ellie Carabello (V.P.), Kevin O'Connor 
(President), Karen Hunter (Recording Secretary), Marl< Carter (Treasurer) Top, Ruth Lucas, John Martines, Robin Lord, Scot 
Wilson, Terri Sambuchi, Tish O'Connell, Steve lorio, Dave Barrows, Jeff Yarchin, Bobbi Lees, Jon Abedon, Jeff Jacobs, 
Nick Chigos, Ellie Levine 



X 






THE 
MGB 



Mens 

Governing 

Board 



Bottom, Left To Right, Everett Levenson, Randy Felice, Jeff Yarchin, V. P. Peter Paulli, 2nd 
Row, Russ Law, Carl Scheig, Rick Young, Clark Linehan, Jim Soverel, 3rd Row, Bob Kahl, 
President Jeb Killion, Justin Burrill, Rick Poison, Jeff Schaefer, Jim O'Hara, Ray Elderidge, 
Baku Raymond. Insert Left Chris Seymour, Right, Wade Keats. Missing: Ron Kozel & Duke 
Gilbert 



What used to be called (and many still will) the Men's Dormitot7 Council revamped their con- 
stitution into an organization for all the college men: The Men's Governing Board. Led by Presi- 
dent Killion this MGB raised more money than ever before and helped sponsor several events. 
They also brought to Curry a most memorable show: "The Gong Show". 




I 



"Kaf" became a lifetime member of the 
MGB in March. His life was short but 
memorable. He was quoted as saying "I 
like the food here in the Senate office 
more than my old home!". 



178 



THE 
WSGA 

Women's Self 
Governing Association 



The WSGA led a productive, if quiet, 
life in lb-11 . Passing from the leadership 
of two-time President Patty North to Tish 
O'Connell the Women's Self Governing Asso- 
ciation major contribution was installing in- 
tercom phones in the dorms. They ran a Body 
Beautiful Contest, formed the election for 
homecoming queen, and sponsored several 
happy hours. 

They too rewrote their constitution. They 
now represent all women at the decision mak- 
ing level of the College. Future plans call for 
the WSGA to produce student directories, run 
a book exchange, and start a Big Sister/Lit- 
tle Sister program. 




First Row, Left To Right. Jane Furey, iVleislna Aii<ens, Heather 
Ruhl, Ruth Lucas, 2nd, CoUeen Hanley, Debbie Bennett, Ellie 
Festner, Marjorie IVlcMullen. 3rd, Judy Pacheco, Cindy Luca, 
Kim Bolden, Robyn Holson. Last, Heidi Webb, Karen Hunter, 
Sue Kupferberg, President Tish O'Connell, Marilyn Stiglitz, and 
Rosemary Trainor, 




Executive Board Officers: Tish O'Connell, Ruth Lucas, and Patty 
North. Missing: Maureen Durkin 




Left To Right, President IVIichael 
O'Sullivan, Gretchen Baker, Linda 
Granskie, Sheila Holt, Jim Kelly, 
Pam Calarese, Lenty Homans. 
Insert: Rich Smillie. 



COMMUTER'S 
COUNCIL 



Still a few dedicated souls work hard to make an identity for the commuters. The Commuter's 
Council is their voice and these people have worked to correct wrongs. 

The leadership changed near year's end to Michael O'Sullivan, who has helped get proposals 
past Goldrick's desk, and these proposals look promising for the future: a refitted commuter's 
lounge designed for comfort, and a reasonable meal plan for the commuters. 

Future Promise: Good. Praise to the few who work for us all. 




MEDIA CENTER 



Under Richard Bengston and Mike Mahoney the Media Center 
has become a facility accessable to students and faculty alike. All 
the way from projectors for educational movies to sound systems for 
Horseracing Night these two individuals have put in so many more 
hours than they were paid for they just have to be included in the 
student organizations section. Umm, that's Rick with the singing 
voice. 



Working with these machines can 






^ \\ - -V 




. . lead to drinking! 



The Directors: Rick Padula, Donna Neri, Pat Cleary, and Norman 
Hopping 



LOOSE 
CABOOSE 



The Loose Caboose served another 
fine year as Curry students answer to 
midweek boredom. Stocked with fine 
beers this year, the "Pub" also gave 
hungry students a place to find a bite 
to eat . 

Upstairs, the room was redone with 
an air of recreation in mind, as new 
games were brought in. Downstairs, a 
new juke box, pinball machines, and the 
all time favorite fooseball games pro- 
vided entertainment. 

The Loose Caboose also can be re^ 
membered for some dances that they 
held, and some live entertainment and 
giveaway nights. 




Clockwise, Left To Right, Kitty Richards, Sheila Holt, Heidi Webb, 
Marty Silsby, Dave Meyer, Matt Paul, Kevin Keating, Scot Wilson, 
Tish McNeil. 





Shown Bouncing: Trevor Massiah and Mike Va- 
rasso. At Left. Above: Bruce Tagrin and Tish 
McNeill. 




SOCIAL COMMITTEE 



Top Left, Fall Com- 
mittee: Gary Leo- 
pold, Kevin O'Con- 
nor, Sue Damberg, 
Bobbi Lees, Kathy 
Sexton, IMancee 
Chalifour. Top Right, 
Spring Committee 
Chairpersons: Jeff 
Tarleton and Kathy 
Sexton Right, Fall 
Chairwoman IMancee 
Chalifour. 



Spring Committee: Dave Bean, Jeff Tarleton, Kathy Sexton, Ron 
Kozel, Rick Bengston, Bruce Tagrin, Mike Mahoney 




The Student Senate Social Committee once again provided lots of activities. Regular dances 
and happy hours weren't where it stopped though. 

IMancee Chalifour ran the committee for a year through Dec. '76. She has to be congratulated 
as she was the first woman to have the post, and what an excellent job she did! She presented a 
program of variety, including movies, disco dances, a costume ball; along with traditional dances 
and happy hours. Remember South Shore Country Club for Homecoming! 

Jeff Tarleton and Kathy Sexton continued the tradition of having events for everyones taste. 
The year was capped at Schaefer Stadium for Spring Weekend. 

The Social Committe is a lot of work by a few dedicated people for all our enjoyment. 



THIS PAGE AND NEXT: 



RECALL 



Among Social Committee productions were Musica Orbus, an excellent con- 
cert. Left, and the Gong Show! 






DANCES! 




SOC-COM PRESENTS: 



At Left, the brass band SPUR. Top: refreshments at a happy 
hour. Drink up! 



Casino Above. How much did you lose? At Right: ly/lime. 




WMLN 



"The New Kid in Town", or Your Station. . .". Our student station WMLN. One of our student 
senators thinks it is WLandM. Oh well. That is better than still being called WVAC, our old call 
letters. But whatever it is called it is our station. 

The folks there work hard, for no fortune, and very little fame. They come out to do discos for 
dances, and request lines for happy hours. They are getting their education in radio broadcasting, 
and hopefully will get their moneysworth. It is a very attractive facility at Curry (the radio 
station), and one that is being well used, even though we should or possibly should've listened to 
it more often. 



ON YOUR DIAL 91.5 FM 






^-;'}{ ^ 4 





Bottom, Left To Right, BiM AHey, Jay Trotsky, 
Doug Pressman, Paul Russo, Bob Cox, Joyce 
Herling, Mike Mahoney, Jordan Ricfi, BiM 
Schultz, Peter Horn. 2nd, Dennis Canning, Rich 
Beach, Dick Perez, Dave Weiss, Rick Poison, 
Thom Carroll, Joe Donelan, Jim Kirk, Phil Zur, 
Alan Hollingsworth, Kathy Serafini, Mark Cem- 
ber, John Harrison, "Sharl<y" Jack Nash, Jamie 
Scheur, Sue Bernard, Sherri Bernardi, Mark Car- 
ter, Jim Krebs, Rick Bengston, Jeff Lowe. 



The two fearless leaders (lets say 
General Manager and Station Man- 
ager) of WMLN: Rick Bengston, 
GM On The Left, and On The 
Right Jeff Lowe, SM. 




WHO'S WHO 
WHO'S WHO 
WHO'S WHO 
WHO'S WHO 
WHO'S WHO 
WHO'S WHO 
WHO'S WHO 
WHO'S WHO 

IN AMERICAN COLLEGES 





)M^ 



MARIA T. BACIGALUPO 

Senior 

Dean's List 

Student Intern 

student member Academic Advising Team 

Committee on Student Life 

Secondary Education Award Winner 1976 




GRETCHEN BAKER 

Junior 

Student Assistant Div. of Behavioral 
Science and Education (2 1/2 years) 

Editor, 'Tine Currier-Times" 

Student rep on Faculty Evaluation Com- 
mittee 

Treasurer and member Commuter Coun- 
cil, 1976 

Orientation Committee member 

Editor 1976 Orientation handbook 

Outstanding Woman Commuter Student 
1975-76, 76-77 




NANCEE CHALIFOUR 

Senior 

Dean's List 

Alexander Graham Bell Honor Society 

RA 74-76 

Assistant House Advisor-Jr. and Sr. years 

Yearbook section editor-1975-76 

WSGA dorm President, 1973 

Women's football 1975 

IT AC- 3 years, VP 75-76 

Choreographer for 'IVIame", T 

'South Pacific', 'Cabaret' 
Committee on student life 
football program sales chairman 74-76 
class VP, 75-76 

Social Cpmmittee Chairwoman 75-76 
Homecoming Queen 76 
Parent's Weekend co-chairperson 




RUTH E. BURACK 

Senior 

Dean's List 

Freshman Chemistry Award 

Nursing Studies Teaching Assistant 

Student Research Assistant for Div. of 

Nursing Studies 
Yearbook Staff-3 years. Editor '77 
Manager-Trainer of Football Team, 1976 








SUE DAM BERG 

Senior 

Dean's List 

Treasurer and dorm rep. WSGA 

Co-chairman of Parent's Weekend 

Secretary-Finance Committee 

Library Committee 

Social Committee-Special Events 

Student Advisory Committee 

Affiliate of Mass. Assoc, for Children with 

Learning Disabilities 
Yearbook section Editor 
Women's football 




MORE 
WHO'S WHO 




JODY GUSTIN 

Senior 

Dean's List 

Sr. Class President 

Jr. Class President 

Student Senate 

Internship WBZ-TV, Spring 76 

RA 75-76 

Parent's Weekend Committee 

WMLIM newscaster-74-75 

Women's football 74-75 

IT AC 74 



GARY W. LEOPOLD 

Senior 

Dean's List 

Alexander Graham Bell Honor Society 

(Cochairman 75-76) 
WMLN News Staff 74-75, News Directof 

76 
Baseball 75 

Intramural sports 74-76 
Student Senate 76 
Cochairperson Parent's Weekend 
Student Editor-CURRY COMMENT 
IT AC Cabaret 75 
Business Manager 'South Pacific' 



RICHARD H. RENDON 

Senior 

Dean's List 

RA-Jr. year 

Honors House Coordinator Sr. year 

Varsity football -freshman 

Academic Internship-Aide to Congressman Joseph Moakley 

Student Senate -Jr. 

Student Senate Vice President 

Chairman Student Senate Athletic Committee 

Women's varsity football coach 1976 





MARILYN E. SANDBERG 

Senior 

Teaching Assistant Boston University 74-75 

Assistant for the Population Institute of Washington, DC 

76 with the Campus Action Program 
Volunteer: Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and the Wal- 

tham Hospital 
Student Internship at Fernald State School, 74-75 



MORE 
WHO'S WHO 




JANICE E. STANOVICH 

Senior 

Dean's List EVERY semester 

Food Committee-two years 

Currier-Times staff 

Student Coordinator of switchboard-two years 




PATRICIA A. NORTH 

Senior 

Dean's List 

President WSGA Jr. and Sr. years; Sec. Soph, year, Rep.-Frosh. year 

Campus Judiciary Board 

Social Committee member 

Food Committee member 

Admissions Committee member 

Orientation Committee member 

Section editor yearbook 

Cheerleader freshman year 

Girl's varsity football 

Loose Caboose employee three years 




CHEERLEADERS 
1976 



The cheerleaders once again demonstrated Curry 
enthusiasm as they cheered the football team onto 
victories. 

The ladies were present at every game, as far 
away as Plymouth, N.H., and New Haven, Conn., 
in a great demonstration of Curry love. Led by 
Kathy Sexton and Terry Sambuchi, the girls had a 
tremendous year. 





\. i 



Top, Gretchen Gel man, Terry Thomas, Pat Schmiegelow, Heidi 
Webb. Middle, Kathy Sexton, Linda Pompliano, Meisha Aikins, 
Terry Sambuchi. Front, Ginny Balchunas, Missing: Lisa Haber. 





Bottom, Left To Right, Jeff Tarleton (Business IVlanager), Heidi Webb (Asst. Ed.), Steve Medwid, 
Jamie Scheur. 2nd, John DeJesu (Arts Ed.), Patty Platz, Sam Shutts, Gretchen Baker (Editor), 
Kathy Sexton, Kim Bolden, Jordan Rich (Asst, Ed.), Ron Kozol (Ad manager), Karen Hunter, Jon 
Abedon. Insert: Suzanne Roquomore 



THE CURRIER-TIMES 



The Currier-Times grew by leaps antJ bounds this year to become highly respectecJ and much 
applauded after a near disasterous previous year. The staff of course was responsible for the 
Newspaper's growth into both a journalistic outlet and a carrier of both campus and off-campus news 
of relevancy. c ■ [.^ 

The growth of the paper was rewarded by the Senate, which authorized weekly papers ot eight 
pages second semester. The Times finally obtained their own camera, and also sought and re- 
ceived outside financial help from subscriptions in a record breaking ad campaign. 

The newspaper had a fantastic year, and it is hoped that last year was the shape of things to 
come. 




In The Middle Sits Editor Gret- 
chen Baker, Flanked by her 
assistants Jordan Rich and Heidi 
Webb 




B.S.U. 



The Black Student Union started the year as the Third World 
Organization but changed names midway. Still it is the club for 
intermixing minority's culture over Curry's campus. 

The BSU scored a big hit with Cultural Weekend which in- 
cluded a dance and a movie. 



...^Ml,. ^ ^ ^ i "^^TBuLLU.. 




Above, BSU President Meisha 
Aikins. Right: a scene from the 
Cultural Weekend Dance present 
ed to us from the Elma Lewis 
School. 



ALEXANDER 

GRAHAM 

BELL 

HONOR 

SOCIETY 



Kneeling: Rich Naran, Standing 
Left To Right, Maria Bacigalupo, 
Joanne Roderiques, Heidi Franke, 
Jeff Lowe, Ruth Burack, Gary 
Leopold, Mancee Chalifour, Rick 
Bengston. 





Front, Dr. Moissiy, Dr. Sherring, Ann Bowie, Armand Arief, Marjorie McMullen, Richard Clif- 
ford, Back, Bahman Kimiachi, Tanapat Lapcharoen, Michael Oiuwa, Dr. Martinez, Omotunde 
Adeyinka, Chan Donavanik, Pat Schmiegelow, Iris Hardoon 

INTERNATIONAL CLUB 



The International Club once again had an exciting year 
of culture mixture. They culminated the year with an ex- 
cellent dinner-dance in room 119. 




Scenes from the dinner dance Michael Oluwa 

and Omotunde Adeyinka at Top Nick Chigos 

Upper Right. 





CURRY ARTS JOURNAL 



"This year we have taken a turn toward the creat- 
ive, so to speak. We have employed various new tech- 
niques to the innovative descendant of the Curry Arts 
Journal . 

Hopefully we have provided a solid, artistic found- 
ation from which we can develop steadily and consis- 
tently". 

Sincerely, 

John D. DeJesu 

Editor 

The Journal 



Clockwise, John DeJesu (Editor), Abby An- 
drews, Laurie Jenks, Patty Platz, insert Anne 
Marie Ulm, At Right: Tom WiHiams 




HILLEL 



Front, Co-Presidents 
David Landy and 
Everett Levenson. 
Back, Larry Stir- 
ling, Debbie Malch- 
man, Maxine 
Namerow. 




Hillel continues to exist at Curry, but just barely. The members who participated this 
year cannot be faulted for the smallness of the club however, as they have actively pushed 
the club events, which last year included special brunches and a folk dance. 



FOOD COMMITTEE 



The Food Committee has done 
unthanked work, and will continue 
to improve what is probably the 
biggest gripe to resident students: 
food. Change this on the menu, 
change that, cook this or that 
differently, don't pass off this 
to us any more; whatever 




STUDENT SERVICE CENTER 




Maxine Namerow, BMI Medwid, Heidi Webb, Jane Furey, Helene Gelberg, Rick Young, Debbie 
Souter 



The Student Service Center became that when the Drop In Center changed their name and add- 
ed new services. In addition to the peer counseling that they've done in the past they also offer 
a sound proof study room, sales of concert tickets, and travel information. They also sponsored 
the Bill Baird-Dr. Mildred Jefferson debate that was attended by everyone. 




, , , . Charlie's Angels , 



". . . . and when we get 
to the Pub I'm gonna 
whip your pants in foose- 
ball ..." 





"now, see that guy wearing 75 . . , isn't he 
cute?" 



-^ W I V 




". . . I'm not smiling 'cause 
they just closed the bar ... 




"and the finding of the committee was this: twelve were for ending 
this meeting, and we killed the other two ..." 




A beer can make any student government meeting passable. 








October 1,2,3 

8:15 p.m. 

Foard Auditorium 



Director: Janet L. Kirschenmann 
Assistant Director: Katlierine Goldsmith 
Stage Manager: Charles Kirby Wadsworth 
Business Manager: William Round 



Barbara Love Eunice Hubbell 

Debi White Negro Woman 

Robin Lord Stella Kowalski 

Douglas Pressman . Stanley Kowalski 

Bruce Marsh Steve Hubbell 

William Round Harold "Mitch" Mitchell 

Heidi C. Franke Blanche du Bois 

Jeff Blodgett Pablo Gonzales 

Geoffrey Cambell Paperboy 

Ellie Caraballo Mexican Woman 

Michael Cohen Doctor 

Karen Riley Nurse 




Ot^(^m ^ Old Cacf.^ 



December 10,11,12 

8:15 
Foard Auditorium 



Director: Beth Sullivan 
Assistant Director: Robin Lord 
Production Manager: Richard Naran 
Business Manager: William Round 



Heidi C. Franke Abby Brewster 

Stephen Majsak Dr. Harper 

Douglas Pressman Teddy Brewster 

William Round Officer Brophy 

Bill Taht Officer Kline 

Pattie Platz Martha Brewster 

Elise Murphy Elaine Harper 

Geoffrey Cambell Mortimer Brewster 

Robert Pauley Mr. Gibbs 

Thom Carroll Jonathan Brewster 

Bruce Marsh Dr. Einstein 

W. Sydnor Fearing Corpse 

James Kirk Officer O'Hara 

Michael Cohen Lieutenant Rooney 

Jeff Blodgett Mr. Witherspoon 



w^ 





Teddy on his way to dig more "locks" 
in the Panama Canal! 






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J(\dfpj.Adeyst C/(\j2.atrp cvt Cun^i 



Car^siVa 



April 1,2,3 

8:15 

Foard Auditorium 



DIRECTOR: HEIDI C. 
FRANKE 




MARCO 



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V/or\ci (jO 






HEK 




Li, 




THE 

GREAT 
ALONZO 








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CHANGES 

I SEE CHANGES ALL AROUND 

We've heard it called the Administration 



were doing, but it did get to resemble 
Musical Chairs. 

Dean Kirschenmann led the Shuffle by 
announcing that he was resigning for 



him, and it was time for a change. 



representative of the Board of Trustees 
announced that President Hafer was being 
named Chancellor of the College. 




FACULTY 



The Shuffle was only just beginning . . 

The end of the school year was quickly 
approaching, and Dean Capalbo announced 
his resignation. Me was leaving Curry to 
accept a position at his Alma Mater, Boston 
College. 

The Faculty didn't quite catch onto the 
Shuffle. There are two Faculty members 
who are retiring, and we will be hiring new 
Faculty for our new Nursing Program. 

Several members of the Student Senate felt 
that they had to clean up the corruption 
that was accumulating at the back of the 
Cafeteria. Joe and Tex Watson, and Robert 
Foppiano were replaced. 

The Shuffle was shifting and only time would 
tell where it would strike next. 



STAFF 



CHANGES... 





RESIGNING 

Frederick Kirschenmann 

"Only The Educated Are Free". 

"I was bom and raised on a ranch in North 
Dakota and still find a deep sense of satisfac- 
tion in riding horses and tractors. My primary 
objective is to engage students in a learning 
environment which makes it possible for all 
participants, including me, to learn from each 
other," Dean Kirschenmann will be returning 
to his life of horses and tractors and is build- 
ing his own solar home. 






NAMED CHANCELLOR 

John S. Hafer 

"Success is to be measured not so 
much by the position that one has 
reached in life as by the obstacles 
which he has overcome while trying 
to succeed. 

John Hafer was appointed President of 
Curry College in 1965. In just five years, 
under his leadership, the College received 
full accreditation from the New England 
Association of Schools and Colleges, In his 
long and distinguished service, the College's 
enrollment has more than doubled, its faculty 
more than tripled, and its library volumes 
more than tripled. The President recommend- 
ed to the Trustees that they search for a new 
President to lead the College into this new era 
and free him to serve the College in a new 
capacity. 

RESIGNING 

Robert F. Capalbo 

"No man is the wiser For his 
learning: it may administer matter to 
work in, or objects to work upon; but 
wit and wisdom are born with a 
man." 

"Students have a naturally healthy cynical 
and critical attitude. Their irreverence for 
institutions and rejection of jargon, coupled 
with the questioning of those things most ac- 
cepted by society, can be refined in a con- 
temporary setting forged by historical per- 
spective and the use of analytical tools, A 
survivor of Lombard Hall: Dean Capalbo will 
be moving back to Boston College to assume 
another position involving Student Life. 




RETIRING 

Alexander Moissiy 

"You are not an author, as you are not an artist, 
unless from your own heart you add to the 
treasures of art something which would not have 
existed if you had not been born." 

"Anyone can learn a foreign language if we change 
the traditional method of teaching to a more flexible me- 
thod based on practical conversation in the classroom re- 
inforced by the facilities of the Curry language laboratory." 
We will certainly miss one of the more special professors 
that Curry has had, and we hope that Professor Moissiy en- 
joys his retirement. 




RETIRING 

Kathleen McCann 

"Education makes people easy to lead, but difficult 
to drive; easy to govern, but impossible to 
enslave." 

"I hope that each student who works with me will gain 
for himself or herself and share with others a lasting learning 
experience." We have always enjoyed the productions that 
Professor McCann has put on, and will especially miss them 
on graduation Weekend, 



...TURN AND FACE THE STRANGE 



i^^iiippsdn 



SCIENCE 




John Hovorka 

Math and Physics 



A 




Eleanor Wilder 

Admlnistratiye Assistant 
Lab Instructor 





/ 



Indar Kamal 

Photography And Math 



Jerold Touger 




John Holloway 

Biology 



John Tramondozzi 

Chemistry 




Denise Growley 

Anatomy 

Physiology 

Microbiology 



SOCIAL SCIENCE 



JOE ECKERT 

Chairperson 

Economics 



Lee Nason 

Administrative Assistant 




Robert Garden 

History 





Robert Wertheimer 

Management 



Robert Keighton 

Government 



John Hill 

Government 



Allan Greenberg 

History 
Registrar 




Judson Lyon 

History 



Joseph Finn 

Management 



BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE AND EDUCATION 

Chairperson 





Carl Cooper 

Psychology 



Dante Germanotta 

Sociology 







Gerald Hilyard 

Sociology 




Barbara Fournier 

Psychology 




Bruce Steinberg 

Psychology 



Albert Sherring 

Sociology 




Danny O'Sullivan 

Education 



Gertrude Webb 

Learning Diabilities 



Judy Kennedy 

Education 




Carol Wadell 

Learning Disabilities 




Donna Cataldo, Sue Higgins, Roberta McFee, Pam Brown 

Tutors 

Pat Locke 



A 

n s 

n o 

c 

L I 

e I 

V ° 

n 




t 213 



HUMANITIES 



Chairperson 
C. Alan Anderson 

Philosophy 




John Hahnfeld 

Philosophy 




11 '^■■' 



Ron Warners 

Fine Arts 



Russell Pregeant 

Philosophy 
on Sabbatical 




George Wharton 

Communications 




Dorothy Ross 

Administrative Assistant 




LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Joe Schneider 

English 



Claudine Hogarth 

English 



Chairperson 




Frances Kohak 

English 




Marvin Mandeil 

English 



Tamara Moissiy 

Language Lab 



„n \i 




L\ 



Gladys Martinez 

Spanish 



r 




Edwards Hastings 

English 





Donald McNeil 

Vice-President for Development 



Hiram Evans 

Vice-President for Research 



THE 
BOARD 

OF 
TRUSTEES 




NURSING STUDIES 



Chairperson 





Sandra Rasmussen 



Jack Holloway 

Coordinator of Arts and Science 

Arlyne Saperstein 

Coordinator of Nursing 



The Division of Nursing Studies was 
finally approved by the Massachusetts 
Board of Nursing on May 26th, 
1977, The Transition class will en- 
ter Curry in September as sophomores, 
and we wi 1 1 see a new c lass of freshmen . 




Rita McCarthy 

Administrative Assistant 




Richard Mantz 

Dean of Admissions 



Deirdre Kozlowski 

Assistant Dean of Counseling 



Kim Lipsky 

Counseling 




John Gawne 

Dean of Counseling 



Diana Dea Horak 

Continuing Education 



■''' I 





Helen LeBaron 

Bursar 



THEY SPEND 
OUR MONEY! 



Jack Vallely 

Director 




Jim Salvucci 

Assistant to the Dean 





Joe Gibbons 

Financial Aid 



Warren Bazirgan 

Public Relations 
Yearbook Adviser 




Mary Granskie 

Assistant To The Business Manager 





Ann Burnaby 

Development 



ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 



Director 




Bob Connelly 

Assistant Varsity Football Coach 
Intramural Director 
Girl's Softball Coach 



Tom Stephens 

Head Varsity Football Coach 




JackVallely 

Varsity Baseball Coach 



Varsity Tennis Coach 




Dianna Cocuzza 
Ass't to the Dean 



Robert Capalbo 
Dean of Student Life 



Steve Reul 
Ass't to the Dean 






A 



Tft 







\A; ,. 




ife^ 



-wy: 



Two Heads Are Better Than One?? 





Ruth MacDonald 

Administrative Assistant to the Dean 
of Student Life 



There goes the diet until Monday! 



HOUSING STAFF 



Eric Arena 
Elise Baker 
i\Jancee Chaiifour 
Thomas Gahr 
Helene Gelberg 
Jody Gustin 
Norman Hopping 
Stephen lorio 
James Larkin 
Robin Lord 
John Martines 
Steven McGinnity 
Richard Rendon 
JoAnne Roderiques 
Terry Sambuchi 
Marty Scheraiis 
Kathy Sexton 
Robert Smith 
Jeff Tarleton 
Jeanne Turner 



STAFF 




Dorothy Moran 

Assistant To The Recorder 



Doris Burgess 

Recorder 



Rita Redmond 

Manager, Bool<stor«^ 





Helen Sawtelle 

Bookstore 




"The Ladies Behind The Cage" 
Mary Stefanoni, Laura Pierce, Phyllis O'Brien 




Ted Kelleher, Edith Lee, Mary Uva, Natalie Coughlin, Joe Watson, Robert Fop- 
pianno, Tex Watson, and Phyllis Crocker 



Joyce Kelley 

Administrative 
Assistant In 
Admissions 



Kay McCartney 

Administrative 
Assistant In 
Public Relations 



Doris Hove 

Administrative 
Assistant To The 
President 




Gertrude Besdansky 

Administrative Assistant, Admissions 




Julia DePaolo 

Machine Room 



June Roberts 

Administrative 

Assistant To The 

Dean Of The College 



His bark is worse than his bite! 

Tom Casey 

Postmaster 



nil 



Sam Manzi 

Data Processing 



Evelyn Snowling 

Key-Punch & Machine Operator 




Jeremiah Harrington 




Director Of Security Services 






Sergeants 




Wilbur Beavans 


4-12 Midnight | 


Paul Jeannetti 




8-4 P.M. 


Edward McLean 


8-4 P. M 


Sat 8c Sun 



Lee Harrington 

Administrative Assistant To The 
Director Of Security Services 



225 



LIBRARY STAFF 




Carol Strempek 




A I Romanus 



James Parrel I 



MAINTENANCE 




Trudy Maiden 




John Boudreau 



William Hagman 



Fernando Formica 

Retired In December 

Lino Zaniboni 
George Pratt 



Frederick Eddy 




Patrick Donovan 





Lawrence Guerra 



BOOSTERS 



Mr. 8c Mrs. Warren S. 

Bazirgan 
Mr. 8c Mrs. LeRoy M. 

Brain 
J. H. Burrill 
Diane 8c Morton Cohen 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Kevin Daley 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Waltor P. 

Green 



Mr. 8c Mrs. James Hanley 
Frank A. LoConte 8c 

Family 
Frank Reardon 
Mr. Lawrence Stiglitz 
Mr, 8c Mrs. John L. Varga 
Emil G. Young 




SPONSORS 



Mr. James Andrade 
Anonymous 

Mr. i Mrs. William H. Bowie 
Mr. & Mrs. Philip Burack 
Mr. 8. Mrs. Harold Damberg 
Mr. & Mrs. Anthony Di Gennaro 
M. Constance Dooley 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Leo Feeney 
Mr, & Mrs. Patrick J. Foley 
Parent's Of Ted Gallant 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Sheldon Holson 
Mr. 8c Mrs. F. J. Kingsbury 
Mr. 8c Mrs. C. S. Knight 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert J. Kunz 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Burton R. Levenson 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Richard E. Love 
Edward J. McLean 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Joseph McMullen 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Walter A. Miller 
Mr. 8c Mrs. W. Lawrence Miner 

Jr. 
Mr. 8c Mrs. James F. O'Hara 
Mr. 8c Mrs. James S. O'Sullivan 
Mr. 8c Mrs. William A. Robbins 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Morris J. Rosenbaum 
Robert Sack 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Arthur F. Stephens 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Timothy J, Sullivan 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Tagrin 
Mrs. M. S. Talley 
Joan 8c Morris Tarleton 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Anthony S. J. 

Tomasello 
Mr, 8c Mrs. Edward L. Turner 
Mr. 8c Mrs. P. J. Van Ollefen 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Gerald Vigdor 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Joseph C. Werner 
Mr. 8c Mrs. Robert W. Wilson 





PATRONS 



James & Maryilynn Alcott 

Mr. & Mrs. hrwin R. Bragg Jr. 

Mr. Sc Mrs. William Finkel 

Mr, 8c Mrs. Gelman 

Diana & Harry Hatch 

Mr. Sc Mrs. Leo Holstein 

Mr, & Mrs. H. Scott Kenyon 

Mr. & Mrs. Frederick Kirschenmann 

Mr. Ic Mrs. Victor Kupferberg 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Arthur North 

Mr. 8c Mrs. James H. Scheuer 

Mayer David Sudouk 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Paul Thompson 

J. R. Tomlinson 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John D. Wickham 



SPECIAL PATRONS 




Muriel 8c Roscoe Dusek 


Mr. 8c Mrs. Thomas Moran 




Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Gustin 


Frank Scollan O'Neill 




J.H. Hollingsworth 


Mr. 8c Mrs. A.Pagelson, Brooklyn, 
NY 

Donald E. Pompliano 

Paul 8c Joan Powell 

Mr. Robert A. Raeburn 

Frank R. Wheeler 




Estelle 8c John Holly 

Mr. 8c Mrs. John L. Indlveri 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Irvin Janet 

Mr. 8c Mrs. Nicholas W. Marlines 




FACULTY AND STAFF CONTRIBUTORS 




Will Bevans 


Kathleen B. McCann 




Dr. Carl Cooper 


Rita McCarthy 




Mary P. Granskie 


Sandra Rasmussen, R.N., PhD 




Edward Hastings 


Professor Albert Sherring 




Diana Dea Horak 


Dorothy 8c Jack Vallely 




Professor John Hovorka 


Mr. 8c Mrs. Chester Webb 




i 




233 




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EDITOR 




A circle within a circle ... we have complet- 
ed another circle in our journey through life. We 
all set certain goals for ourselves and we all 
went after them at different paces. We will 
spend our entire lives striving to fulfill dreams 
and to achieve all that we set out to do. I wonder 
if we ever really see an end to the circles. 

It has been a four year journey, but it was dif- 
ferent for each one of us, and our senior section 
shows just how different it was. All of the sen- 
iors who contributed a 1/2 page spread can be 
proud of the job that they did, and proud of the 
fact that they contributed to the best book that 
Curry will ever see. 

A lot of thought went into designing this book, 
and it was the result of a lot of hard work on my 
part and on the part of a few good staff members. 
To: Nancee and Patty, Mary, Chris, Debby, 
Diane C. and Cathy, Jeff, Susan and Abbie . . 
. without your help we could never have 
achieved what I have been hoping for for over a 
year. Diane G. - you did excellent work and I'm 
sorry that I didn't use you more, but they'll need 
you next year. Eric - You lost the film, but you 
made Physics fun! I would also like to thank 
Bob Murphy and Pat Carney, of American Year- 



book, for their time and constructive creative- 
ness. You all gave me the confidence that I 
needed when the going got rough. 

When we leave Curry it will be for another 
style of life. We will look back at this book and 
remember all of the times we laughed and cried. 
We will remember the goodtimes we had most of 
all , and the people we shared these goodtimes 
with. We will all grow with Curry behind us, but 
we can never come back . . . 

I don't know what I am searching for 
I never have opened that door 
Tomorrow may find me at last 
Turning my back on the past 
Time will tell of stars that fell a 

million years ago 
Memories can never take you back home 
You can never go home anymore 

And so, from here we must go on. I have 
shared my four years here with people who have 
made those years worthwhile: Christine, Patty, 
John, Cindee, Sue, Richie, Mel, Jeff, Rick, 
Rita McCarthy, the Football Team, Nancee, 
Ronnie, Susan, Janice, Carol, Norman ... it 
was through all of you that I saw Curry, and for 
you that I have worked so hard to make this more 
than just a yearbook. It is my gift to all of you. 
peace and love, 



Senior Section 

Patricia North 
Nancee Chalifour 

Assisted by Cindee Luca 








Jeff 
Tarleton 





Artwork 

PaulEllis .. 135, 143, 148, 158, 159, 36 

AliceFell 133, 134, 123 

Wendy Leopold X)riginal Clown 

Design p 202 

Ruth Burack Cover Design 

Artwork on 
Pages: 1, 248, 201, 202, 197 



Copy 

Steve Medwid 
Sports 



Lore Browner 

Calligraphy In Theatre 

Section 



Copy is by section 
editors unless other- 
wise indicated. 



Activities 

Mary Carneiro 




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Ads And Ends 




Diane Catinella, Below 
Kathy Wilson, Left 



Abble Andrew 



Sue Damberg 




Additional Work 

Divider Pages Ruth-Ellen Burack 

2-3, 68-69, 104-105 
204-205, 228-229 

118,119 Nancee Chalifour 

174, 175 Jeff Tarleton 

News Pages and Color Spreads 

Sports pages 78-103 

Pages 166-173 

Faculty and Staff pages 206-207 

and revisions Editor 



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Faculty And Staff 




Ruth Lucas 


Robyn Holson 


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Sports 



Sue Meagher 




SJ. ^^?^ 



pages 70-77 



Terry Sambuchi 




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CANDIDS 

Diane Genovario 
Jim Young 
Jeff Tarleton 
Ted Gallant 
Ruth-Ellen Burack 
Eric Arena 
Nick Chigos 




♦r T 




1. - -: V » 



Jim Young, Diane Genovario, Ted Gallant 



Ted Gallant 

Soccer 

Men and Women's Basketball Team 

Hypnotist 

Bill Baird 

Streetcar Named Desire 

Arsenic and Old Lace 



Charles W. Flagg 
Miller Studio 



Graduation 
Faculty and Staff 
Men's Football 
Men's Basketball 
Hockey 
Tennis 



Academic Convocation 
Homecoming Dinner Dance 
Spring Weekend 
Organizations 
Men's Baseball 



Ruth-Ellen Burack 



Intramural Sports 
Organizations 
Musica Orbis 
Happy Hour 
Gong Show 
Cultural Weekend 
Carnival 



All College Celebration 
Women's Softball 
Men's Baseball 
Senior Week 
Renaissance Fair 
Hockey 



Robert Raeburn 

Page 32 

Michael Mahoney 

Award's Night 



Ed Hojnowski 
Miller Studio 

Men's Football 
Horseracing 
Parent's Weekend 
Organizations 



Color Photography 

Charles W. Flagg 
Ruth-Ellen Burack 
Ed Hojnowski 

Scott Wilson 

Valentine's Dance 
International Night 



PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS 




THE 




All my life's a circle, sunrise and sundown 

All my life's a circle, but I can't tell you why 

The seasons spinning 'round again. 

The years keep rolling by. 

Seems like I've been here before, 

I can't remember when. 

But I've got this funny feeling. 

That I'll be here once again. 

There are no clear cut beginnings, 

and so far no dead ends. 

I've found you a thousand times, 

I guess you've done the same. 

All my life's a circle, sunrise and sundown 

All my life's a circle... 

A circle within a circle... 

A wheel within a wheel... 




END 




" / 



248 -^ 



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